collapse


* User Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Who's Online

pascalfortier

Dot Guests: 170 | Dot Users
Dot Hidden: 0

* Board Stats

  • stats Total Members: 12966
  • stats Total Posts: 130013
  • stats Total Topics: 18185
  • stats Total Categories: 5
  • stats Total Boards: 48
  • stats Most Online: 814

* Advertisers

Gear Pan
The lil Gold Spinner
BC GOLD
The lil Gold Spinner
The Pocket Sluice

Author Topic: Shaker Table Plans  (Read 72896 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline auhunter

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 130
  • Kudos: 0
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2009, 10:56:29 PM »

Also, would anyone have any experience with stamp mills, for crushing qtz veins.   


 {-down-}
Electrified 1-Stamp Mill

Offline GoldFever

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 154
  • Kudos: 2
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2009, 03:16:36 PM »
Also, would anyone have any experience with stamp mills, for crushing qtz veins.   

That would be great if you could Todd, I would like to see some more shots of it before I tackle this project.

Thanks in advance <-good_>

Offline pasty

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Kudos: 0
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2009, 03:21:48 PM »
Hi, I started to make the shaker table, and I was going to use  A good set of sliders that is used on drawers . They have good bearings to roll on. I was going use a sewing machine motor, the speed can be control-ed , the only thing is the Rubber band, and how is it connected to produce a Knock??   Pasty

Offline GollyMrScience

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 2951
  • Province/State: Near Edmonton Alberta
  • Kudos: 160
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2009, 04:45:38 PM »
I will have to take a real close look at the shaker table you are trying to duplicate but generally the rubber band would serve as a spring to actially pull the table back against a bumper after the motor with a cam or some such pulls it away.
The idea is that the spring works faster than the motor to snap the table back quickly.
Be very careful choosing what to use for sliders as the dirt and grunge will really take its toll on wimpy units.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline Todd

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 3
  • Kudos: 0
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2009, 03:29:31 PM »
Hey Golly,

Am in the construction phase of the table.  Have the deck with riffles built and the bearings and chains etc all ready to go.  Was considering mounting the deck on sliders for kitchen cupboard drawers, they slide well, but figured the water and sand would gum up.  After couple other ideas have decided to try wooden guides with hard plastic / teflon sliders, simple to start with and easy to clean and maintain. 
 
The next thought is the adjustment on the knock around 4mm to 1 cm.   I want this to be adjustable for fine tuning the operatiion when recovering fine gold. 
Mayby have it all together in a couple of weeks if I get enough time.
 
Todd 

Offline GollyMrScience

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 2951
  • Province/State: Near Edmonton Alberta
  • Kudos: 160
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2009, 05:25:14 PM »
Todd you might consider using just two flat pieces of fairly thin "Puckboard" as both the support and the mechanism for movement.
Pieces are used like legs down from the table to the frame. Not sure on the size of your table but the pieces are oriented so they are wider across the table . As the table moves the legs bend with the table.
Many table designs use this system including the eutec, silver springs and gemini.
Very simple and bulletproof. Can't clog or jam.
Many tables have a fixed throw in that the table will move away from the bumper the same distance every time because of the mechanical setup but then the bumper is a rubber pad on a threaded rod that can be screwed in and out to intercept the table as the rubber band pulls it back. This will in effect shoren the throw and the period of the throw to some degree.

I have a Eutec table here for some fixing up. The Eutec uses two flat thin steel plates as legs to get the same flex that puckboard does. Remind me and I will try to take a pic to show you the legs. Of course the commercial tables are much more than the legs so each has its own way of controlling all the variables but the legs are simple and if they would work for you will save you a lot of hassles. The flat plate puckboard plastic or steel flex plate legs is nothing new or special but it works great.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline pasty

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Kudos: 0
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #26 on: July 05, 2009, 02:03:17 PM »
HOLD IT Guys, This table is used for cleanup only. Your big stuff is not put on the table ,only the Fines. So I think this table is used at home where you can use a Dimmer switch to control a small Electric motor to run the shaker. The thing is this table is so simple to make, that a person can't see the trees for the forest ( this is my trouble ).
           Pasty

Offline GollyMrScience

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 2951
  • Province/State: Near Edmonton Alberta
  • Kudos: 160
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #27 on: November 10, 2012, 02:36:52 PM »
I am hauling this thread out of mothballs as Geo2 asked some questions about it in another recent thread and it really does deserve some attention.

We had a couple of people saying they were working on building one but I never did see reports back. Did anyone ever finish a table of this design off?
I am not real big on hand crank designs for tables because of the difficulty in keeping the action consistent. The real strength of tables is that they are consistent so as you make adjustments you don't have other variables changing. Table speed being a big one especially if that is tied to the throw and force imparted if using a bumper.
Nevertheless, if faced with nothing else available hand crank it is but I would be working real hard to whittle me a little electric motor! <-laugh->
Even a small 12V running off a battery would run a table this small. Besides you need to get water to it in a consistent manner too and while it can be done with a pail feeding a holding tank set higher than the table that would get real tiresome in short order.

The questions Geo2 asked were:
"I ask about the BGS hand cranked shaker table - I know this is not the right topic to post, but forgive me, I am just trying to benefit from the experts here  - I read the other topic discussing it bu some concepts aren't clear to me. Take for example the suspension system or using roller caster wheels. I just can't get it .Any chances of clarification lessons here"

So the suspension system plays such an important part in the action that it should be given some careful consideration. Off the top of my head I can remember looking at suspension systems using rollers or wheels running in or on tracks, cable hung, on swivel arms,  on slider bearings, on simple open ball bearing races, on flexible "legs" made out of plastic, metal and in one design wood. Maybe one or two others too but those are the main ones. On little tables like this one you sure don't need much to do the job just something trouble free is nice.
I talked earlier in this thread about concerns with bearings and tracks getting dirt in them and gumming things up. One thought was to use caster wheels set with the wheels pointing up and fitting into tracks on the bottom of the table made out of channel steel. The 'U" shape of the track facing down and going over the outside of the caster wheels that way dirt cant get caught in the track and the wheels can easily be oiled from the side. You can take that one step further and go for pully type wheels  using the groove and the track is just one side of an angle iron pointing down with the other side bolted to the bottom of the table. Makes like an upside down train track with the grooved pully wheel on the bottom and the table riding back and forth on it with the angle iron track. You could do it the other way around but for some reason I like the wheels on the bottom as its easier to get in and oil or grease them without making a mess.
The legs type have become my favorite in some ways because they are so simple and they cannot get gummed up. The leg is simply fastened with one end at the table and the other on the frame and it flexes just enough to let the table move back and forth. Some designs use actual legs with relatively thin legs at each corner and some use more of a single wide sheet like leg. The one issue with legs is that if the throw is really long. Because the ends are fixed the table can end up doing arcs in its motion as it gets to one side the leg is bending enough to cause that end to dip. Not a big issue though as the length of throw should be short enough that the table is not flexing the leg that much.
The other real big issue is how to impart the shake. Fixed pitman type arm, offset cam driving a bumper wheel, reciprocating linkage, offset weight on a flywheel etc?
Well I've started a book here. Better step back and let some others toss some ideas into the mix.
More later.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline Goldcrow

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 1183
  • Kudos: 3
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #28 on: November 10, 2012, 02:57:50 PM »
I think for cheap/easy build, the leg flex would be best. The flywheel/offset type action would be less tiring & easier to keep a constant speed, once started. I agree with the motor drive, but that may not be an option for our less fortunate compadres.  :)
Work smart..and hard

Offline GollyMrScience

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 2951
  • Province/State: Near Edmonton Alberta
  • Kudos: 160
Re: Shaker Table Plans
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2012, 10:12:23 PM »
I agree Goldcrow the flywheel with weights is a pretty simple system and is easier to run by hand. Its the design that I come back to whenever I am doodling and designing the "perfect" portable mini table.  <-laugh-> Also agree on the legs -  gunge and dirt can't goof them up and they dont need oil or grease plus they never get sticky or need adjusting. The puck board flex sheets/legs on my gemini are over 26 years old and still work fine. The metal sheet/legs on my RP-4 are not as old but can't see them wearing out anytime soon ...like....never. The longer thin strap steel legs on a Silver Springs table are similarly robust but did get bent on shipping  so maybe a bit less bullet proof though that table has been in service for at least 20 years. Matching the right flex to the table will take some experimenting but it ain't that hard.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

 


Gear Pan
Gold Rat