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Author Topic: PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA? SURE IS!  (Read 27135 times)

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Offline Steppegold

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PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA? SURE IS!
« on: February 28, 2007, 02:02:38 PM »
I've concocted a NORTH CAROLINA LIST for placer gold.
Inevitably its a short list, but I hope its useful - any additions welcome!

cheers - Steppe

Offline Steppegold

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A-C - PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2007, 02:11:26 PM »
Anon (year?) Gold in North Carolina.
read at: www.geology.enr.state.nc.us/Gold%20brochure/Gold%20Brochure%2012222000.htm
Anon (1896). North Carolina and Its Resources. Page: placer gold mining - Burk County. North Carolina Board of Agriculture. Winston: M.I. & J.C. Stewart, Public Printers and Binders.
read at: http://docsouth.unc.edu/nc/state/ill11.html
Anon (1972). The First Gold Rush: A Master Plan for Reed Gold Mine. National Park Service.
Anon (year). Reed Gold Mine.
read at: www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/reed/reed.htm
Archdale, Everts C.H. (1971). A Rational Approach to Marine Placers. Kitty Hawk, Roanoke Island Northeast, Wanchese, Oregon Inlet, Pea Island, Rodanthe University of Wisconsin Ph.D. dissertation, 272 pages. 
Boitnott, David W. (1999). The North Carolina Gold Rush - First in the Nation.
read at: http://dboitnott.home.mindspring.com/Articles/nc_gold_rush.html
Bryson, H.J. (1936). Gold Deposits in North Carolina. North Carolina Department of Conservation and Development Bulletin #38. 157 pages.
Brief account of placers in North Carolina, particularly of eluvial saprolitic placers.
Carpenter, R.H.; and S.F. Carpenter (1991). Heavy Mineral Deposits in the Upper Coastal Plain of North Carolina and Virginia. Economic Geology volume 86, pages 1657-1671.
Carpenter, P. Albert III (1972, revised 1978). Gold resources of North Carolina. North Carolina Geological Survey, Information Circular #21.
Brief summary of information from many older, out-of-print reports dealing with the gold deposits of the state. The report contains generalized locality maps and a listing of mines by county.

Offline Steppegold

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D-K - PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2007, 02:15:05 PM »
D'Agostino, J. P.; and R.G. Schmidt (1986). Gold in panned concentrates from southern Alamance County, central North Carolina. United States Geological Survey USGS Open File Report #86-453, 14 pages.
Funk, Linda (1979). The Reed Gold Mine Guidebook. North Carolina Office of Archives & History.
Hairr, John (2004). Gold Mines of North Carolina. Arcadia Publishing. 128 pages. ISBN 0738517364
Heyla, V. (1996). Survey of gold-bearing deposits of the Eastern and East-Central United States: A historical review. Ore Deposits and Deep Structure of the Earth. Colloquium, Prague 28th June 1992. Global Tectonics and Metallogeny, volume 5.
Hines, Elizabeth; and Michael S. Smith (2002). Gold is where you find it: Placer mining in North Carolina, 1799-1849. Earth Sciences History, volume 21, pages 119-149.
Knapp, Richard F. (1999). Golden Promise in the Piedmont: The Story of John Reed's Mine. North Carolina Office of Archives & History, Revised Edition, 1999.
Knapp, Richard F.; and Brent D. Glass (1999). Gold Mining in North Carolina. North Carolina Office of Archives & History, 1999.
Knapp, Richard F.; and Brent D. Glass (year?). Gold Mining in North Carolina: A Bicentennial History. Order from the Historical Publications Section, 4622 Mail Service Center

Offline Steppegold

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L-Z - PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2007, 02:23:51 PM »
Lewis, Rebecca (2006). The North Carolina Gold Rush. Tar Heel Junior Historian, volume 45, 3 pages.
download in ACROBAT from: www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/S06.gold.rush.pdf
Miller, J. William; John E. Callahan and James R. Craig (2002). Mercury interactions in a simulated gold placer. Applied Geochemistry, volume 17, pages 21-28.
A lab-based simulated stream was used to determine if dissolved Hg could be transported through sediment and deposited as amalgam on Au particles. Hg was placed in a sump at one end and gold grains buried in the gravel at the other end. Water was circulated. The Hg content of the water increased from nil to 0.5 μg/l after 22 days. The Hg content on the rims of Au grains went from nil to 0.2 wt.% over 22 days peaking at 0.48 wt.% after 14 days. The Hg on Au grains fell to 0.19 wt.% Hg at 552 days and 0.05 wt.% at 851 days. Why Hg first deposited on Au was then dissolved is discussed. The simulated Au placer, with its coarse sediments and free water flow, is analogous to streams that have measurable (>0.2 μg/l) Hg in the water and no amalgams on Au grains. The Amazon Basin has similar water concentrations of Hg. Lower 0.55 μg/l Hg in stream water and a lack of amalgams on Au grains occur in Au placers near Talladega, Alabama. The opposite case are streams with less-than-measurable (<0.2 μg/l) Hg but having amalgams on Au grains, where conditions are less aerated and Hg would be more likely to remain in the substrate. This may be so with Au placers in the North Carolina Piedmont (South Mountains, Robbins, and High Point), where Hg is not detected in stream water (<0.2 μg/l) but Au grains possess amalgamated rims.
Nitze and Hanna (1896, reprinted 1995). Gold deposits of North Carolina. North Carolina Geological Survey, Bulletin #3.
10$ from: www.geology.enr.state.nc.us/
Geological descriptions of the gold deposits of the Blue Ridge and Piedmont of North Carolina. While dated, this publication provides useful information today, including exploration and remediation for suburban development sited above old gold workings.
Overley, Charles (1981). Big Tenís Map of North Carolina gold: 300 mines & prospects, creeks & branches, secondary roads, panning technique, gold facts, large scale: gold history, background, karat, characteristics, weight, fineness. Cocoa Beach, Florida, Big Ten (publisher)
6 maps on 1 sheet: both sides, colour; 45 x 93cm. Three hundred North Carolina gold mines and prospecting sites are shown in 34 counties.
Phifer, Sam E. (1988). The Howie Gold Mine, North Carolina. International California Mining Journal ICMJ, issue June 1998.
Phifer, Sam E. (2000). Mystery of the Reed Gold Mine Nuggets. International California Mining Journal ICMJ, issue July 2000.
Williams, Lloyd (1964). Titanium deposits of North Carolina. North Carolina Geological Survey, Information Circular #19.
3$ from: www.geology.enr.state.nc.us/
Summarizes the investigation of 110 mineral deposits for titanium and associated minerals in North Carolina. The author identified two types: (1) titaniferous hard rock deposits, and (2) heavy mineral placer deposits. Location maps, occurrence descriptions, and chemical analyses are contained in the report.

Phew, that's all I can dig out for North Carolina.
 ;D
Steppe

VikingSniper

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Re: PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA? SURE IS!
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2008, 09:39:29 AM »
NC MAP

Offline cxander78

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Re: PLACER GOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA? SURE IS!
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2009, 08:38:46 AM »
North Carolina was the site of the nations first gold rush and theres many more places to find gold there than are on this map.Almost the entire western section of the state is gold bearing.Just to let people know.