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Author Topic: deflocculants  (Read 6122 times)

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Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2010, 09:51:46 PM »
Forgot to say name of sieve from ceramics supply.
The one I use is called the Talisman Production Sieve. Very whizzy hand sieve for fine powders duplicating the action of brushing the powder across the mesh with a stiff  brush.
The main unit is hand cranked and you can switch out the sieves.
The crank assembly sits into the top of a five gallon pail, Expensive though - probably close to 200 bucks now.  The sieve screens are around $25 to $35  each and come in a range to 200 mesh.
If you are willing to do the sieving without the fancy crank system you can get a sieve pan that will hold the screens in it and you can do it all by hand. You can buy the pan and just the sieve sizes you want. As I remember it there is a close range between 20 and 120 then nothing till 200 so quite a gap in sizing there.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline jack

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2010, 09:56:29 PM »
 
  I think that I've seen micron sized screens for water filters ( cartridge type ) made of brass or stainless

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2010, 10:12:24 PM »
I also use a thing called a slip mixer in the lab to break down clays. essentilly a high speed high torque prop type mixer. slip is just liquified clay and you can add more water to thin it further. I got mine from a ceramic business auction but you could probably cobble something together from stuff at Princess Auto or similar.
While you are in ceramics supply mode check out their deflocculants as well. Products like Darvan (a couple of varieties) might be of interest.
If looking for a cheap pug mill type mixer you can use a used bread maker. I have bought them for as little as five bucks from second hand stores.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline tomcat

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2010, 11:34:40 AM »
What about using high frequency sound agitation and force the clay apart like a kids boom box.
Or bursts of high pressure air to float the clay microns out.
Or would that just solidify the clay again  <-dont~know->
Or some form of anode cathode process ....hummm

Offline WorkinHard

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2010, 07:49:30 AM »
I used to work at a hotel with a pool as a maintenance worker. We used to have to test the Alkalinity of the water twice a day and add more if needed. The product was provided by EcoLab and is called "Total Alkalinity".
It makes the clumps of dirt come apart and makes it easier on the filter since the chunks are broken down into small particles.

Perhaps you could find some if you know anyone who runs a commercial swimming pool. I can get some if you'd like to try. No cost, just pay the shipping...  Let me know! :)

If I ever end up in a spot with lots of clay I'm gonna try it.

Offline bobinsk

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2019, 06:16:20 PM »
Hey guys, I hate to go so far back and re-visit an old post. BUT, I had a need for information about fine gold in clay and ... with a lot of digging, found this old post.
I had  3 x 5 gal. pails marked "fines with clay" that had been sitting in my shop for 4 or 5 years. Finally time to do something with them. So I started panning them out. Lots of gobs of clay, very hard to get them to dissolve and separate the gold out.
I added lots ( and I mean lots) of Dawn liquid soap to try and disperse the clay. Seemed to work and I got some fine gold but not what i was expecting.
After 4 hours of playing with the first pail ... I was sure that I did not want to go through that for all of them.
So, I came to the Forum and tried inputting "fine gold from clay" no luck. "Getting fine gold out of clay" no luck. and so on. I finally took a poke at this one titled "deflocculant" and it was exactly what I needed.
So I started the experiment. Used the first item on the list to make the clay lose it's particle charge and drop out the sand and gold. I mixed 1 cup of Sodium Carbonate with 3 cups of water then added that to a gallon of the clay mixture.
Some experiments you wait 24 hours, some you wait 48 hours. Being a patient man, i waited 20 minutes and guess what ?
The clay separated from the gold and I could pan it out like nobody's business.
I'm not saying this will work for everyone's clay. You will have to experiment. You may get halfway down the list of PH-adjusting chemicals before hitting the correct one ... but try it !
It works !!  Now if anyone out there knows how to change the title from flocculants or deflocculants to "Fine gold in Clay " it might help others to find this post easier and help them solve their problem.  Good luck.
I tried it on the materials that I had almost discarded from the first 4-hour panning attempt and inside of 1/2 hour got about 70% more gold out the the discards.


Offline mcbain

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2019, 07:01:39 PM »
Hi.Bob you have stumbled on to some thing that works for you .No need to change a post.Start a new one under General mining.I am surre you will get lots of feedback.Luck,Mcbain.
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

Offline Shrewdly

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2019, 11:37:04 PM »
Hi Bob:  The ceramics industry (china and pottery) use hydrocyclones  to separate the different fractions of clay.  Since they separate particle sizes of clay they should do a relatively good job of separation where there is a significant differential in specific gravity. Most cyclones are about 90% efficient  putting two cyclones in series would give you about 99% recovery.
Another idea would be along the lines of a jig. I don't know if a pulsing column of water would work, but a long column of water with a relatively low velocity should carry off any clay while permitting the gold to settle.  The flow would have to be laminar in nature.  A  U-Tube with one side higher than the other would work.  The clear water would enter on the higher side while clay/ gold slurry would be fed across the top of the lower tube. The tube should actually resemble a lower case u with a leg extending below the U. This should be on the shorter side of the U and act as a trap for the gold.

Good Luck
Shrewdly

Offline doonhamer

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Re: deflocculants
« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2019, 10:16:18 PM »
A little confused here, re: flocculant and when to use..

Past experience with diamond and placer gold processing  from  clay .. truly lots of both mechanical and  water flushing  actions  .
when using flocculant i only did this in west Africa  and Indonesia where Au  particles  were known to float off in samples while setting up test plants ( we were sampling  rig not production rig  ) we did use flocculant to clear water in the recirc tanks ..

 


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