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Author Topic: Gold Cube Technology  (Read 208219 times)

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Offline juu907

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #40 on: March 09, 2011, 02:47:41 PM »
 <-wave-> 1/8"  mesh size is the number of openings in i inch.   jerry

Offline JOE S (INDY)

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #41 on: March 09, 2011, 06:45:34 PM »
Yes, sir - jerry is right.

A #8 classifer has 8 openings to the inch.  The actual opening is 1/8" minus the diameter of the wire it's made from.  So, if the wire is 1/64" diameter the opening would be 1/8" minus 1/64" --- or --- 7/64" x 7/64"   [-1st-]

A #30 mesh would be 1/30" minus the wire diameter, too.

Pretty easy to see until you get into the insanely small meshes like, say, a #400 or #1000

Joe
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Offline native112472

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #42 on: March 09, 2011, 09:08:56 PM »

Great...thanks guys

Offline Okie

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #43 on: March 12, 2011, 09:36:26 AM »
I just received my gold cube last week. We also ordered their hand dredge kit, should be here next week. After watching the video's of them getting gold from  lake superior beach sand i had to have this cube and now i cant wait until the snow gets out of here. Although i think I'm going to need a bit more of the hose than was provided with the cube, is this a common hose that i can pick up anywhere?  also Because I'm new at this what is the actual opening size of #8 mesh and so on? 
 
Thanks everyone..

Glad you got your cube, I have been out using mine for the last week in AZ.  Had a great time and found some real good gold!   The hose that we are using can be found in the lowes and Home Depots here in Oklahoma, otherwise, go to boat supply places as this is a bilge pump hose.  1-1/8" size.  If you get a 1-1/4" just wrap tape around the nipples until it fit snug.  Also, pre-wet the mats when you are ready to use them.  Just turn them over in some water and slap the mats to force water into the deep crevasses, this will eliminate the air bubbles.  Do not use a surfactant in the water.   If you are going to be using it on the beach you may consider using a 12 mesh classifier.  This will eliminate a lot of material and will keep you running cleaner.  8 mesh will do fine though.  If I have to lugg buckets I use 12 if I am close I use 8. 

Mike

Offline Greg in BC

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #44 on: March 13, 2011, 10:58:03 AM »
Mike, just curious as to why a person should not use a surfactant?  Have you found it negatively affects effictiveness?

Offline Okie

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #45 on: March 13, 2011, 12:28:38 PM »
All the material is pulled underwater, the gold will never see air again until a clean-up.  If you use a surfactant, you are only creating bubbles and effecting normal flow of water.  The Cube was designed this way to be able to use raw water, a mud puddle if necessary and not risk loosing gold.  When the mats are pre-wet at set-up, there will be no issues with trapped bubbles in the mat, this tip is being added to the instruction booklet.  We have put pulverized ore into the Cube completely dry and have pulled gold out of it.  A second run produced no gold and a panning of the tailings came up empty as well.  So bottom line, pre-wet the mat and no surfactant. 

Mike

Offline Greg in BC

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #46 on: March 13, 2011, 06:41:49 PM »
Ok thanks Mike, makes sense. Greg

Offline goldmann

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #47 on: March 14, 2011, 10:45:54 PM »
Surfactants are compounds that lower the surface tension of a liquid, the interfacial tension between two liquids, or that between a liquid and a solid. Surfactants may act as detergents, wetting agents, emulsifiers, foaming agents, and dispersants.

I think that means do not use either any type of soap or Jet Dry with the Gold Cube.

MIKE,
Pre-wet the mats by slapping them with your hand underwater.
1) Do the mats-trays have to be turned over upside-down to do this, or not?

1 & 1/4" hose will work if 1 & 1/8" hose is not available.
2) I was told not to use lay-flat hose for a 12 volt bilge pump on another forum because it causes too much drag(performance loss), I still do not know for sure?
BUT I suppose the flexable solid clear plastic type of hose will also work.
 
3) What is the very maximum hose length that can be used with the Gold Cube's stock 1100 GPH bilge pump?

4) What size-type of in-line fuse is to be used with that stock pump?   I gather to use a maximum 5 Amp size in-line fuse, no bigger and only a fast acting type of fuse. Also note that this pump draws 2.5 Amp.

5) Also I suppose the 1" gasoline powered Honda WX-10 (34 usGPM--2040 GPH) water pump would work with the Gold Cube at slow idle(throttle)?

Thank you!

Offline Okie

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #48 on: March 15, 2011, 06:21:55 AM »
Surfactants or anything with bubbles are not needed with the Gold Cube.  Your gold will not float after the first drop, then it gets stuck and it yours to keep.

Pre-wetting can be done with a squirt bottle as well but without a bottle, it is fastest to turn it upside down or at least on it's side to keep the water draining.

Layflat hose requires pressure to expand.  A bilge pump offers volume at low pressure so a open hose is required.  The maximum length we have used that we noticed material collecting in the trough was 5 feet.  With a 3 foot lift. 

For the fuse application, 2X the amp rating is good so your suggestion of 5 amps will be just fine.  I've never used one but know some of our customers that do.  If the pump was installed under a deck in a boat, I would say definitely use a fuse.  Out in the open right where you are monitoring everything, I say it is less important. 

Your 1" pump idled back should work though I would use a valve to adjust the flow.  Them little monsters put out a lot of water.  Adjust it so the water quits squeezing out all the cracks and you are ready to go.

Thanks for bringing up all these little details for classification.  Happy prospecting!

Mike

 

Offline k0diak

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #49 on: March 20, 2011, 04:47:29 AM »
Howdee Mike!

Hope all is well with you and your family...  As you are probably aware from the shipping notices, my Gold Cube arrived a few weeks ago.  Unfortunately life was a little too busy for me a little over the past month with work, so my hobby interest in prospecting had to be set aside for a bit. I didn't even get a chance to unbox the Gold Cube until this past week.  For those just catching this post, I purchaseed a Gold Cube in early 2011.  I've just recently taken the Gold Cube out of the shipping box and I have no affiliation with Gold Cube, I am just a recreational prospector who was intrigued with the equipment design and purchased. Although I can foresee resellers distributing Gold Cube kits globally.  My posts in this thread reflect my experiences using the Gold Cube for efficent classifying materials as a novice miner just starting out in the learning curve.  Once I can actually see the ground again, I'll start to include pictures when I use the Gold Cube this season. For now, there is just too much snow.  <-dont~know->

The Gold Cube arrived as a well packaged shipment.  Simple assembly, but I think part of that is because I believe I have watched every video on the Gold Cube, from development and prototypes, through to your current model. I really like the compact design of Gold Cube kit, and the quality material your trays are made out of.  The trays are sturdy, not something that is going to bend or dent, out of the box ready to classify material and take the abuse of the outdoors.  Unpacking the box I thought the support legs/frame that the Gold Cube sits on should have been made out of a thicker material, but once I had the Gold Cube setup; I could see that the frame size was strong and more than adequate for the purpose of leveling the Gold Cube.  Light frame/legs suit the purpose of keeping the overal kit weight down to help with transport to remote locations. 

The frustration of having new mining equipment arrive and there is still four feet of snow on the ground.  I managed to fight the urge to tinker with the Gold Cube for a whole two weeks or so, and then gave in and setup the Gold Cube in the basement, and ordered a bag of pay-dirt shipped to my location.   The very first run of the material was a success, my 4-stack deluxe kit was into production use in minutes.  I had probably 70% in the 1st tray, 20% in the 2nd, and 10% in the 3rd tray.  I ran the material through a 2nd & 3rd time with a few colors showing up in the 2nd, and in the 3rd run I could only find 2 colors. 

If I were to offer anything from my experience with the Gold Cube thus far, that would be; consideration for a little longer pump hose, maybe 10ft? Secondly, I would encourage some sort of instruction set with the package to help new owners 'tweak' their Gold Cube skills for maximum retension of gold.  Even if it was a Gold Cube Tips & Tricks pamphlet included in the kit. Personally, I've taken the time to dig for every piece of info on the Gold Cube (GC) that was on the Internet before purchasing, From all that browsing I think I have picked up a few operational tips in the CGPF - Gold Cube thread and the YouTube videos that have been helpful in tuning the GC's performance. Stressing things like pre-wetting the tray mats to avoid bubble or air pocket issues.  The importance of level operation to avoid material build-ups in the mats on the down slope side of a GC that is unlevel.  Maybe a tid-bit on the physical setup, your recommended and maximum flow rates, no wetting agents, level operations. Even fun facts like the GC could hold up to 5 ounces before requiring the cons to be cleaned out, or using electrical tape wrap to adjust from 1-1/8 to 1-1/4 hose, etc.

Personally I didn't have any problems with the setup of the GC, but I've watched every video and read every thread on the Cube. Whereas my claim partner came over to inspect the new equipment purchased as I was about to run the cons thru a 2nd & 3rd time. My partener didn't know anything about it at all, other than it was some sort of vertical sluice in a box, or such was what he offered as his understanding in buying a GC.  The only area he wasn't sure of during the setup was the recirc. feed pipe section with the loose top plate, but the rest went smoothly. 

We're probably another 4-6 weeks away from being free of snow and soft enough for a shovel to go into the ground. Unless there is a sudden heat wave, as it has been a long winter with record levels of snow.  But once we can get the GC out in the field in late April, I'll post an update on the GC once we can break ground.  Early in the season, I know, plus high waters will still be an issue for most locations.  So far, with the paydirt I've used as a prelimiary test, the cube to live up to expectation of handling a larger volume of cons at a time.  From the very limited time we've had tweaking the GC, I can see that testing different flow rates will tune into efficency of gold retension, from fine, very fine, and flour.  Each batch of cons should be run multiple times, higher flow rate at first, then reduce the flow rate a little, and re-run the cons.  The lower flow rate kept flour gold and specks that were flushed through at the higher flow rate.  Depending on how many buckets of cons one has to process, but I could see pushing all fresh cons through the GC at a higher flow rate.  Then once a few of the buckets in the session have been processed at a higher flow rate, theyn reprocess the bucket cons a 2nd time in the GC at a lower flow rate.  I am looking forward to testing this type approach to processing cons once I can get out in the field with the GC. 

I also look forward to hearing more about your development of some sort of hopper or feeder for the GC.  I've been eagle-eye'in various materials for just that purpose.  It would be nice to be able to have a sturdy crashbox-like feeder. Something that can handle washing muddy clumps of 3" cobbler stone from the shovel. With some sort of  strong spray-wash action above the grizzly that has a gentle slope so the material doesn't fall from the feeder too fast. Not before being well washed, and the grizzly drops thru 1/8" classified cons into the GC (could even handle cons screened to 3/16).  There probably water flow considerations between the grizzly and the GC itself, but those flow rates could be adjusted by valves, and so far it seems that the GC has quite a bit of leahway on the flow rate it can handle and still efficently process cons.

I did run some 1/4" classified material from the pay dirt I've been playing with. For the most part the GC kept up to the increase in size without difficulty.  But I also witnessed why the Gold Cube is specified to process 1/8" or finer cons.  As I did find that one oval shaped piece of 1/4" rock did get wedged in the boil hole going to the 1st tray.  It was 1/4" one way, and about 3/4" on the long edge of the oval.  Processing all the larger (1/4") cons I had at the time, there were about a half dozen larger odd shaped pieces that caught in the mat here and there.   But considering volume of 1/4" classified I ran through it as a quick test, it is hard to base any decision on the results.  Possibly by running the GC for a longer period at 1/4" it may knock loose the material we noticed in a single small volume test.   

I remember also reading in a few different places, that GC owners should be sure to classify down to 1/8" cons. So running the 1/4" cons was testing beyond GC's specifications. In messing around with GC, I did become aware that it important to keep air bubbles off the mat suface for fine(r) gold to fall in the mats. At first I adjusted the flow rate of the water, supecting the flow was too fast for the finer material to fall, and that it was the speed causing white water, which was causing the air bubbles.  When I used the flashlight to get in and see the 1st & 2nd tray surfaces in action, I could see the little bubbles clinging to the mat surfaces. I wasn't using any agent/chem, I just didn't make sure the mats were completely wet the first time I ran the cons in the GC.  Once I made sure all the mats were soaken wet without air clinging on in the crevices, I found that fixed the air bubble issue, and I could actually push a fairly fast flow rate and still capture the very fine 200-400 mesh flour.  The faster flow rates also cleared out more of the black sand. 

** I should also state that all of the GC testing is only based on about 20 pounds of pay-dirt concentrates that I ran through the GC 3 times over two different sessions.  By the 2nd time around, with both of us reviewing the operation of the GC; we were able to tweak the cube quickly.  I can see that with some regular use a person will know what to look for, and what to do if the issue arises. Much like we become with any regular tool we use in prospecting.  Hats off to you guys in designing the GC, so far the cube is living up to all the stated performance markers - and I'm liking it!  ;D

I am biting that the bit for an opportunity to be out classifying some material with the GC in the field.  A few more weeks to wait  <-waiting->   From what I've seen so far, the GC is ready to handle this year's prospecting adventures...

 -k0diak




 


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