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Author Topic: Gold Cube Technology  (Read 208101 times)

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Offline The Fossicker

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #30 on: February 15, 2011, 09:14:43 PM »
Howdy Traveller,
Since I spend much of my time handling fine and micro gold in black sand for myself and my customers, I typically pan 100- 200 mesh gold regularly. What do I use? A $20 Maverick Finishing Pan. Is it hard to do? Not if you know how. Using a so called regular type pan doesn't cut it very well unless you have had mucho practice. I know only a few that can do it efficiently with standard pans. Cheers.

The Fossicker
Pyramid Pro Pan" width="468" height="60" border="0

Offline Number9

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2011, 01:49:09 PM »
One thing is for sure... you got to go slow to recover 100-200 mesh gold in a regular pan! How about gold below 200 with a regular pan... possible?
Yes... but, not many people will work one pan for over 5 minutes! <-laugh->

Testing a creek in North Georgia...

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7K0TkhJ7wY[/youtube]

Mike... my hat's off to ya!!!

Offline Okie

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2011, 03:22:58 PM »
There are a couple of rules to panning, The first and most important is, if everything in your pan is the same size, gold wins!  The second is cut out the middle man.  Magnetite is the middle man, get him out and you will be left with heavy gold and light stuff.  It makes for an easy pan at any size.  There is nothing cooler than to see a 400 mesh smiley face in your pan.  If I am after the small stuff, I dry everything and classify it down 8, 12, 25, 50, 70, 100, 200, 400 then I remove the black sand.  I leave the black sand in as long as possible to be able to knock things around enough to free everything from the gold.  After you take a magnet to each size, then pan everything out.  Oh what fun!  Each pan should take no more than 2 minutes.  I use 2 gold pans to pan out the fine stuff.  Using one as a safety pan then switch and re-pan again then switch again.  Usually by the third pan there's nothing left that looks like gold.  Pan the next batch.  Have fun with it

Mike

Offline Number9

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2011, 04:56:48 PM »
Mike,

Some very good advise!

One problem with this little creek... the black sand wasn't magnetite, 90% was the cousin, hematite. And even using a neodymium magnet would only pull very little material! No problem... 500 mesh gold is only .001"! lol!!!@*

Offline deserdog

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #34 on: February 27, 2011, 05:52:57 PM »
Only about 50 to 60 % of the black sand in a creek I work is able to be removed with a magnet. I wish it could all be removed so easily!!
Cannot find if you do not look!

Offline Okie

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #35 on: February 27, 2011, 06:05:58 PM »
Take every advantage you can get.  The only advantage you have real control over is size, Classify, Classify, Classify, Classify,

Mike

Offline Greg in BC

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #36 on: March 04, 2011, 11:54:47 PM »
Well I promised Mike I would give feedback on my use of the Gold Cube so here is what I have so  far. I have no relationship to the Gold Cube in any way other than buying one.

I have only had a couple chances to run my Gold Cube on some stored cons but have found it to be very efficient.

As mentioned it is very fast and so far I am not finding much to speak of in tailings.

What I like is I can set up my 5 yr old to feed it and not worry about it being overfed. Just as they advertise - no teaspoon feeding here :7 I haven't done a scientific comparison to a micro sluice/CA bucket sluice etc but it seems to be at least equal if not better at the fine gold - but you can push material through MUCH faster.

I did not receive or hear about any "clips" for the spreader bar.  Any pics or more explanation of what these are and how they work?

The spreader is one of my few negatives for this unit.  Great idea but seems like an afterthought.

As I mentioned my spreader came so it just fits loose on the built in shelves.  Water pressure pushes it out of place so water sprays all over.  Need to hold it in place with some large clamps - kind of works but is not professional. This needs a second look for the design.

I would prefer taller walls around the water input and then an adjustable gate. You could add or remove the mat to spread the water and the mat would be easier to wash out.  To my mind this would give more option for spreading the water and may work when feeding undersize as an undercurrent from a sluice or trommel.

Also the mat used to spread the water gets plugged with things.  I am running cons that have been around for many years and have had dog hair and sawdust added to them.  Even after screening to 1/8" there is enough left to clog the carpet which slows the flow and puts backpressure so the water pushes out around the spreader plate.

Regarding the main mat I too found many 'dry' holes after a couple of lengthy runs (once was like 50% of the holes were dry) - might just be our water is highly mineralized?.  I was cncerned that if they were still dry after that much slurry flow then gold would never sit into them.  I now start by pre wetting each tray as I stack them.  Put a little jet dry in some water, pour it on and work all the air bubbles out with a small brush or my hand. After the first (bottom) tray is all wetted I place the next tray on and do the same then set the feeder tray on (3 stack) and go to work. Only takes a couple minutes.

No need to worry if you have some extra soap and are getting bubbles/foam in you main water as the spreader and the gravity gates negate any bubbles that get past the pump.

The trays are easy and quick to clean up although once the gold gets in the bottom of the holes it does like to stay there - which is a good thing. ;-)

I would like to see it come with an extra couple feet of water hose for the pumps so that you can easily set up your recycling system and keep the pump away from the tails. 

I think it would also be proper to supply the pump with some battery clips so you don't have to go out and pick some up before you can get it going.  IMHO you should be able to open the box and start working - not have to go shopping.  It's not a big deal but it should come complete.  I also ended up adding some length to the battery wires so I could have some options on where to have the battery.

One thing I think the manuf should look at is designing a new feeder tray.  Currently it looks to be the same tray as the concentrator trays.  This is understandable as you only need the one mold. However if feeding undersize slurry from a sluice I think it would be best to feed into the top water trough so it gets fully spread and smoothed to go to the other trays. This would likely require the higher trough walls as mentioned above.  Although you could feed onto the flat plate but you might get splash over the sides then.

To my mind it is such a shame to loose the potential of the feeder tray to be another collection area. I always like to get it while I can and perhaps the designers found that having that plate smooth and the same angle give the best feed for the G Force separator? Or is just more economical to have one mold for all.

If you watch when you feed it you can see the odd gold flakes hang back for a bit then scoot off to the other trays.  I would like to be able to get a feel for how the run is going without having to shut down and look at the main trays.  A small drop riffle or a little peice of carpet in the middle or near the bottom on the feeder tray should give intant results that you can view and easily clean out. As mentioned this might require a separate mold though.

It would also be nice to be able to re task the feeder tray as a miller table to do the final clean up of the cons from the Gold Cube so it would be an all in one unit. The angle of the feeder tray plate would need to be flattened out or adjustable and you would need to have an adjustable water flow so you have the thin film separation. It is a perfect little unit for this though as it is not too big and already has the water spreader.

I did get a little damage in shipping on the top edge of one of the trays but it does not affect operations and I think that will easily fix with PVC cement - is that correct Mike?

The unit is nicely built and I am happy with my purchase. I also got the stand and like the way it is built. I will be very interested to see what it does with bank run material (screend of coarse).  Need to figure a way to screen my sluice run and limit the water flow feeding to the unit althogh I think there will be quite a wide range that the unit accepts.

Screening to 1/8" really is not that difficult or time consuming for cons. I found an office garbage can with 1/8" holes for 7$ and the dry cons run right through it.  Five gal bucket takes no time at all although can be a little dusty.

Looking forward to more tests and field work.  So far I have been running some othr clean up sluices on the outfall.  But to be fair the feed rate and water slurry consistency hve not been ideal for them so it is not a clear indicator of what the Gold Cube is missing.  Greg in BC


Vikingsniper

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #37 on: March 05, 2011, 09:44:33 AM »
I have been watching this product and all the chatter for some time.
It looks really neat  {cool^sign} I would really like to see this unit in action using recirculating system + wetting agent  ;D on the North Saskatchewan River or Fraser River.

Great Job....Well Done Okie  [-1st-]


Offline Greg in BC

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #38 on: March 05, 2011, 04:14:34 PM »
VS - looks like I might be coming through Edmonton on the way to Sask in early July.  Would be interesting to get together with you and give it a try. We should make a plan. Greg in BC

Offline native112472

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Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #39 on: March 09, 2011, 01:49:03 PM »
I just recieved my gold cube last week. We also ordered their hand dredge kit, should be here next week. After watching the video's of them getting gold from  lake superior beach sand i had to have this cube and now i cant wait until the snow gets out of here. Although i think i'm going to need a bit more of the hose than was provided with the cube, is this a common hose that i can pick up anywhere?  also Because i'm new at this what is the actual opening size of #8 mesh and so on? 
 
Thanks everyone..

 


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