collapse


* User Info

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

* Who's Online

pascalfortier

Dot Guests: 167 | Dot Users
Dot Hidden: 1

* Board Stats

  • stats Total Members: 12960
  • stats Total Posts: 129970
  • stats Total Topics: 18179
  • stats Total Categories: 5
  • stats Total Boards: 48
  • stats Most Online: 814

* Advertisers

Gear Pan
The lil Gold Spinner
BC GOLD
The lil Gold Spinner
The Pocket Sluice

Author Topic: Gold Cube Technology  (Read 208100 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline GollyMrScience

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 2951
  • Province/State: Near Edmonton Alberta
  • Kudos: 160
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2010, 07:57:33 PM »
Thanks for the input Mike. I thought I recognized the matting. Have been using it on fine gold concentrators for over 20 years and it is amazing what it can recover from classified materials.
Please know that I am not offering the observations as a critique but rather an inclusive approach. So many prospectors want one machine to do it all. Heck we all do. It has to be able to handle bank run rock, smaller than a bread box, weigh less than 15 pounds and process tonnes per hour running off a 12 volt water pump and every hour it should go "Ka Chinnnnggggg" and a bar of pure gold will fall out.
It is very important for people to realize that they have to consider what they are using as part of a system. Not ask it to do something it was not designed to do and give it what it needs to do its job. Recognizing that will prevent disappointment and keep expectations realistic. Part of that is the responsibility of the manufacturers to give people enough info to be realistic in their expectations but part of it is also up to the prospector to BE realistic. Lets face it its a lot more fun to be UNrealistic but not nearly as profitable.
If for instance 8 mesh is what the Gold Cube needs then give it 8 mesh and if a prospector thinks getting 8 mesh is a pain to do with a hand screen and if the Gold Cube is the concentrator they plan on using they should be working on designing a screening system to make that part easier as that is the true bottleneck not the Gold Cube.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline drpop

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 147
  • Kudos: 2
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2010, 09:45:31 PM »
how much will it cost?  How much water does it use. 

Kim

Offline Bill_Carson

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 489
  • Country: 00
  • Kudos: 3
    • The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2010, 10:54:39 AM »
Hi Mike ... as Jerry says; this product bares watching.

In BC, particularly on the Fraser River ... sand on the top of a sand bar is very clean, and works well in basically any type of concentrator ... but when you dig down through the sand and hit bedrock, you'll get fine clay mixed in with the sand (this layer also happens to be where most of the Placer Gold is found), this fine clay will occasionally bunch/clump the sand together in small clumps as it's washed through any type of concentrator ... there's a couple High-Banker manufacturers in BC who have experienced this, and thus they make extra efforts in their Hopper designs to provide an extra wash effect for breaking up the clay-bunching/clumping effect.

Some people use "clay buster" or "clay gone" additives to break up the clay effect when washing through their concentrator. The clay is something we have to deal with once we hit the clay layer that sits on the bedrock layer.... as mentioned above, sand sitting on the top of a sand bar is clean and contains virtually no clay, however, the majority of the Gold sits on the bedrock layer and it's typically encrusted/surrounded in a mushy sand/clay layer.

Do you have a projected cost for one of your units yet?
There are 2 types of people in this world my friend; those with loaded guns, and those who dig.

Offline tomcat

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 1057
  • Kudos: 2
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2010, 11:26:54 AM »
Hummm...most interesting unit.....perhaps I should be reserving serial #0000014....being my luck number and all.
But that is assuming I can afford one  <-dont~know->
Oh yeah...we still have to get it over the border....can we say NAFTA  <~ShOcK~>

Offline Okie

  • CGPF Sponsor
  • *******
  • Posts: 165
  • Kudos: 4
    • Gold Cube
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2010, 02:16:57 PM »
Bill I feel your pain.  I have gotten into some real good areas that just got better the closer to the greasy bedrock we went.  We were shoveling into a power sluice and just kind of quit at the clay.  We took a break for lunch and talked about it a bit and then when we started back up, we sampled the clay.  Holi poop!  It had the best gold of the day.  We tried to wash and scrub it the best we could but what we ended up doing was to put 2 gallons in a 5 gallon bucket and fill the rest of it with water.  We let them sit over night and stirred them real good.  It was pretty soupy but it wasn't clumpy.  It ran just fine trough the power sluice.  That was before the gold cube, I wish i would have had it then.  The water runs at a 15 angle so the mat is always working.  This really keeps the gold pushed down and the light stuff flushed off.  I haven't had a chance to get back to that location so I used the red brick clay here in Oklahoma.  I gathered what I needed for a test and went to making a mess.  I actually found the best way to keep the production moving was to use a mud paddle or paint stirrer.  the kind that fits a 1/2" drill is the best.  It really cuts the clay to a nice sloppy mess.  In about 5 minutes you will have all the chunks rendered down to a soup.  If there is gold it will process just fine.  In the case of Okie gold?  Zip on this experiment.  I did have black sand though.  The Gold Cube ran this rich slurry without a problem.  But as you can see, clay just means you will have to add a step or two no matter what machine you choose to use.  Now where this machine will really help is after the clean-up of a dredge or power sluice.  Those boiler box. com sluices will really break up the clay and you would feel more comfortable doing more frequent cleanups to keep from washing out the fine gold if you had a Gold Cube.  The Gold Cube will take all the cons you could gather in a week and reduce them down to a cup in a few minutes.  That is quite a bit easier to carry out than 10 buckets plus.  Bottom line though that we have found,  If it goes down the trough out of sight, it will not clog the unit.  8 mesh- is it's happy point.  treat it right, and it will return the favor in gold.    Oh and pricing?  We are close to revealing it.  We are working out some details with some wholesalers.  Should have a number for everyone at the end of the week.  Thank you so much for your interest, please keep the questions coming, We have tried to think of everything, but are always willing to learn.

Mike


Hi Mike ... as Jerry says; this product bares watching.

In BC, particularly on the Fraser River ... sand on the top of a sand bar is very clean, and works well in basically any type of concentrator ... but when you dig down through the sand and hit bedrock, you'll get fine clay mixed in with the sand (this layer also happens to be where most of the Placer Gold is found), this fine clay will occasionally bunch/clump the sand together in small clumps as it's washed through any type of concentrator ... there's a couple High-Banker manufacturers in BC who have experienced this, and thus they make extra efforts in their Hopper designs to provide an extra wash effect for breaking up the clay-bunching/clumping effect.

Some people use "clay buster" or "clay gone" additives to break up the clay effect when washing through their concentrator. The clay is something we have to deal with once we hit the clay layer that sits on the bedrock layer.... as mentioned above, sand sitting on the top of a sand bar is clean and contains virtually no clay, however, the majority of the Gold sits on the bedrock layer and it's typically encrusted/surrounded in a mushy sand/clay layer.

Do you have a projected cost for one of your units yet?

Offline lonetree

  • Michigan
  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 122
  • Province/State: Michigan
  • Kudos: 0
  • 200 Mesh Michigan Nuggets!!
    • Squirrel Dog Central
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2010, 06:06:43 PM »
  How much water does it use. 

Kim

Between 800-1100gph if I remember what Mike told me.

Offline Okie

  • CGPF Sponsor
  • *******
  • Posts: 165
  • Kudos: 4
    • Gold Cube
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2010, 06:18:25 PM »
  How much water does it use. 

Kim

Between 800-1100gph if I remember what Mike told me.

That's right.  800 is a must but we will be selling 1100 GPH pumps.  Better to have a little extra water than not enough. 
Mike

Offline Greg in BC

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
  • Province/State: Dawson Creek
  • Kudos: 5
  • Golden memories are not always of gold.
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2010, 07:42:30 PM »
Looks very interesting Okie and glad to see someone finally work with Trev's Treatise On Fine Gold Recovery.  Good on you for giving credit due as well.

You seem to have done an excellent job of taking it to the next step with a lot of testing and re-design to bring it to this marketable stage.  I wish you great success with it.

I am of the school that likes multi recovery media types in my equipment.  Will it be possible to buy partial units that can be incorporated into an existing highbanker.  For instance I have a great shovel in hopper with recovery and screening area. Could this be added below the screen so that a material handling step is reduced?

What would be the max water flow for the Gold Cube? In the above example, the shovel hopper likely has more than 1100gpm (although I could turn it down a bit) - would this overwhelm the Gold Cube trays or would the excess water simply overflow the top?

It's interesting to note that your experiments found a curved bottom to be best instead of the horizontal flat bottom that Trev used. In our early discussions on Goldminers I always wondered about that but never did try experimenting. Kudo's to you and your partners for working through the whole process..  Looking forward to seeing the pricing/S&H details.

Greg in BC

ClickTheYellowChick

  • Guest
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2010, 09:33:44 PM »
...So many prospectors want one machine to do it all. Heck we all do. It has to be able to handle bank run rock, smaller than a bread box, weigh less than 15 pounds and process tonnes per hour running off a 12 volt water pump and every hour it should go "Ka Chinnnnggggg" and a bar of pure gold will fall out.
It is very important for people to realize that they have to consider what they are using as part of a

"Ka Chinnnnggggg"? ? ????? ? ? ?


Mine only goes "KER-PLUNK......sizzzzzzzzzzzzzzzle"  when the yeller falls in the rinse tank after I remove the 2-piece pouring mold surround.

Beings as how I'm a girl and all, I wanna trade in my Ker-Plunk machine for one of those pretty, singing "Ka Chinnnnggggg" models.

Keep me posted, k?  ;D

Megan

Offline GollyMrScience

  • PPT Invited
  • *****
  • Posts: 2951
  • Province/State: Near Edmonton Alberta
  • Kudos: 160
Re: Gold Cube Technology
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2010, 09:43:54 PM »
It is a sad fact that usually when a piece of equipment goes ka-ching its the sound of a bolt falling out or a spring flying off.  ;D
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

 


Gear Pan
Gold Rat