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Author Topic: Ancient River Channel  (Read 14486 times)

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Offline BC Prospector

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Re: Ancient River Channel
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2010, 12:36:25 PM »
Thanks for the videos Golly. I must admit that I had to look up the word lahar. A volcanic eruption under water or ice is my guess but still questionable. I have 4 boulders up to 35 pounds of this material. The sample I mentioned about hen egg size white stones was from a smaller sample. About the size of my fist.The larger samples which I just pulled out of my flower bed are even more interesting. They have bands of crushed angular white quartz along with the larger pebbles. Whats really interesting is in one of these boulders,. there's a three inch band of hematite which is blended into the conglomerate. The boulders all show signs of oxidization. Hi Chuck. From past drilling reports the bedrock should be down about 20 feet on this bench and I'm down only 10 feet before finding this bed of boulders.  All the boulders are close to the same size and elongated. In the glacier til on the hillside above, the rocks and boulders are anywhere from stone size to three feet in size and are not sorted as in my pit. Theres lots of clay in the glacier til. What made me dig in this spot was the oxidization in the soil on the surface. Also there has been sulfides leaching out of the ground in spring runoff. I've never seen a bed of boulders like this before that is so well placed and I was hoping I could learn what made this bed from other members. I'm trying to find a lost channel that produced large  quantities of gold in the past. The pudding stone and hematite are the formations that really interests me. I found  them by chance on an old logging road where a 20 foot  bank had slid down to the road and the pudding stone was exposed on the hill side. I found this pudding stone ranging in size from 2 inches to basketball size boulders and some are well worn and some course.  The smaller hematite nuggets were sticking out of the bank like little black jelly beans and they were all course with no signs of travel. The larger slugs of hematite are smooth and shows signs of travel. This material is only in about 30 or so feet of the bank. Finding this bank excited me more than when I found my first ounce of gold. I'll post some pictures of my findings if I can find out on how to do it . I'm not very good with computers.haha. Thanks for the info.  Hi GioTheGreek. It took me many years and a whole lot of luck to find this bed. Learning what indicators in gold belt areas look like helped me in my search. Lets see if it pans out. Good luck in your search.  

Offline BC Prospector

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Re: Ancient River Channel
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2010, 01:10:10 PM »
Hi Sleeping Village. Yes , I do have that book and it sure opens your mind on how massive that river must have been. What interested me was how the river flowed through the major gold belts in the states and then flowed north into the Purcell mountains  and then north again to the Cariboo gold fields. I prospect in the Cranbrook area and I found that the blue clay he mentioned in the book is associated with some gold here also. There is also a river here that I believe flowed in the opposite direction at one time. With google earth you can see what looks like an old river channel cut deep through a high mountain ridge where no water flows today. Interesting stuff. One has to keep an open mind when it comes to geology. Let me know how you make out.

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: Ancient River Channel
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2010, 07:54:26 AM »
Hi BC - it would be interesting to get a fresh face on that rock in pic 4. Is it iron stained or more to it than that? Giver a smack with a hammer and let us know.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: Ancient River Channel
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2010, 07:13:49 AM »
Some of the pics of the iron rich stuff remind me of a groundwater deposit that is refered to as Wad.
Ya I know kinda lame name but it is interesting stuff. Some guys call it Bog Iron though Bog Iron has a more limonite component to it in my thinking.
Groundwater picks up iron and manganese and then precipitates it in rock and gravel formations. Some of it can look like clinker or even iron lava. It can look "cooked" and has been mistaken as an igneous or hydrothermal deposit by many prospectors.
A highly variable mix of iron minerals and manganese. The manganese makes the stuff dark coloured - even black and sometimes the stuff is really soft.
Many prospectors write it off as poor iron but for me the association is the thing.
I have encountered deposits like it made from the breakdown of sulphides by groundwater and then precipitating into gravels or around springs in the area. It could be considered a gossan mineral if in the right setting.
Placer gravels that are fed groundwater rich in iron can form lenses and veins of iron cemented gravels and sand - concretions and other weird iron thingies.
I have seen gold locked in what was essentially iron cement and even concretions from iron rich groundwater invasion of placer gravels.
At a hardrock mine in New Mexico the operator of the mine took me to look at what he thought was some sort of hardened molten material. He was wondering if it might have been a smelter of some sort from when the Spaniards had been there. It looked for all the world lke a dark red hematite coloured lava had bubbled up out of a small hole in the side of a cliff.
Closer examination showed it to be a mix of groundwater derived iron and manganese with calcium and silca - harder than most wad deposits and given the minimal amount of water moving around there must have taken ages to build up.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline eureka4gold

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Re: Ancient River Channel
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2010, 06:10:54 PM »
 <-wave->I am interested in the ID of the specimen in the first series of photo, 003_0002. jpg. I have found similar  specimam in color and size here on a hillside on the east flanks of the Bradshaw Mountains here in AZ. On Black Canyon Creek, just south of Bumble Bee, AZ. The sample I have found are so hard that a tool steel awl will not scratch them. I have been unsuccessful in breaking one with a rock hammer or 3lb stone hammer. I did take one piece and was able to grind a flat spot with a bench mounted grinder. It was the same color as the outside but polish smooth. I haven't try putting it through a tumbler to see just how polish one might get it. I was thinking it might be some kinda slag, but there is no history of a smelter in the area, and my VLF metal detector will not sound off on it. I just got excited when I saw your pics.
More Au to you, Robert
More Au to you, Robert

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: Ancient River Channel
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2010, 07:37:30 PM »
Eureka is your rock iron coloured all the way through? No obvious crust?
Under magnification can you see something that looks like thin layers?
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

 


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