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Author Topic: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures  (Read 76458 times)

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Offline Greg in BC

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #50 on: February 05, 2010, 10:44:14 AM »
Excellent post set on the moss - never would have thought to go there.

I always assumed the moss held the sands between the moss fibres but it would appear from your pics that the surface is actually sticky and the granules can can also 'stick' to the surface.

 {cool^sign} Much appreciated.

Offline juu907

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #51 on: February 05, 2010, 11:27:30 AM »
we are able to mine the moss on our claims. there is a considerable amount of fines every time it floods. we sampled several areas last sumer and worked them this winter with a gold geni and then a miller table. in our case considering the hassle to process and the destruction on the banks it is not even close to worth it to consider. not saying it wouldnt be somewhere else. we did get gold but not near enough to be worthwhile. just my 2 cents jerry  great site mr finch thank you

Offline finch68

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #52 on: February 05, 2010, 12:20:52 PM »
Here is my take on the moss I looked at.  I agree with GMS that moss doesn't care about efficiency.  In fact it doesn't care about gold for that matter.  However its ability to capture sand that just happens to contain gold is of some benefit to the moss or it would have evolved differently - smooth like grass for example to let the sand go on by.  I suspect that the sand it accumulates helps to anchor the plant to its favourite rock so it doesn't get ripped away by flood waters and high winds.  Also, the accumulated sand may bring some nutrients to the mos to feed on.

I think that the collection of sand and gold is episodic rather than 24/7.  Here is what I mean.  The moss starts to grow on its rock.  Along comes the spring flood carrying tonnes of silt and sand and because the moss has developed these particular leaves and branches that collect sand (sticky, I'm not sure) some of the sand collects on the moss.  Essentially the bottom part of the moss get buried in sand, because the moss is good at collecting it.  Now the moss is anchored more firmly to the rock and can snack on its sand nutrients as it wants.  Then the flood goes away and the moss is exposed to the atmosphere.  But because the sand is good for the moss it quickly grows some more length above the sand bed and has these big leaves that help to shed rain that would otherwise wash away all its hard earned sand.  Also, since the moss is green we know it uses the sun for energy, so it would not do to be completely buried in sand.  The uppermost part of the moss is almost completely clean of sand.  Now undoubtedly some of the sand does get washed away by wind and rain and snow, but not all of it.

Now we get a new spring freshet and the cycle repeats.  i believe that if you could look at sand carefully (I'm not going to do this) you would see annual growth cycles in the sand just like tree rings.  So unlike a sand or gravel bar where the gold tends to move continually downward until it reach bedrock, I think the gold is more or less evenly distributed through the layer of sand in moss.

One more thing; as the moss gets buried the part that is covered in sand can no longer get to the sun so it is not needed for photosynthesis or to collect more sand and so the leaves die off - just like an evergreen tree in the forest loses all its lower branches.  I stitched together a series of pictures to show the full length of a moss stem to show what I mean.  Sorry about the size Larry, but I played with this too long already.



The "root" end is to the left.  You can see that the lower part of the stem has no leaves.  There are larger leaves at the middle.

So, I think that moss is probably pretty good at capturing sand that actually comes in contact with it.  It would be interesting to have a sluice with real moss as the collector to see just how efficient it is.  I think it would be really good.  Perhaps someone will design a real moss lookalike.

finch68

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #53 on: February 05, 2010, 01:17:06 PM »
LOL - I was using the 24/7 as an example of patience (moss is VERY patient) and you are absolutley right to point out that the recovery is episodic. Same with all the gold traps as they are activated when scour and energies actually move material with gold over or through them. The moss or grass on a bar lasts through flood waters and the retained bed of sand in the roots and between stems is certainly acting as an enduring gold trap.
Many years ago I saw some native miners using moss in their sluices. The sluices were regular boxes that had slats across them that resembled riffles but were in fact there to hold blocks of moss. Only fine material was run down the sluice and many of the miners were hand dippng water with three gallon plastic pails. They swore by the recovery but to be fair that was all they really had. One of the miners described to us a sluice owned by a miner who had been able to afford a commercial unit. He was very impressed with the miners moss and expanded metal telling us that it was so much easier to work with. I never did catch up with the miner with the commercial unit but he must have been doing ok because he had a pump and another man working for him.
The miners using moss would work for awhile and then take out the blocks of moss very carefully and barely wash it by turning it upside down in a pan of water. They didn't want to wreck it if they could avoid it so would sort of wash the surface and then reinstall it. They can supposidly cleaned out all the "good"moss in the area and wanted to make the stuff they had last for awhile.
I did not look too closely at the moss in the box though the impression I got was of very short pile carpet appearance rather than the frond type.
There were other miners in the area who were not able to get moss or who had decided it was too much work and they were using a variety of things though burlap sacking was quite popular.
I saw burlap used with and without riffle for both hardrock and placer and with various types of riffles for placer.
I think the overall philosophy was "It may not be the best but its the best I got!"
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!

Offline PlacerPal

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #54 on: February 05, 2010, 02:44:07 PM »
Excellent micro-photographs Finch, rare and very educational at least for me.

I read somewhere that people mining moss use a shopvac or equivalent modified with a leaf blower motor.
That way the sacred riparian vegetation is not destroyed and apparently the gold recovery can be quite good.
After vacuuming the moss they can then take their sniper vac and work the crevices.

Keep up the good work. Thanks

 :)

Offline juu907

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #55 on: February 05, 2010, 03:40:23 PM »
not sure about different types of moss but ours holds a huge amount of sand and even marble sized pebbles. takes a lot of squeezing and rinsing to clean it out. still green on top. got my interest going. this summer i will check out volumes of sand, pebbles and gold in relation to amount of moss. and try some under expanded to see how it does but i expect it will load up with sand very quickly and not be able to clean out. well got to slip outside and do a sun dance to kick breakup into gear. have a good day everyone. jerry

Offline Bayergold

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #56 on: February 06, 2010, 12:27:32 PM »
Hello
Today i look my little Gold in my  Microskop and i see a Neandertal Men .It`s 3 mm big.
 [ Invalid Attachment ]


Bayergold

Offline GPEX admin

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #57 on: February 06, 2010, 02:13:38 PM »
Fossilized prehistorics.... hmmmm.  Cool !!
Somebody said that it couldn't be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That maybe it couldn't but he wouldn't be one
Who'd say so until he had tried.

Offline PlacerPal

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #58 on: February 06, 2010, 07:05:24 PM »
Hello
Today i look my little Gold in my  Microskop and i see a Neandertal Men .It`s 3 mm big.
 [ Invalid Attachment ]

Bayergold

Das ist sehr Cool! Bitte mehr Gold  {cool^sign}

 :)

Offline Bayergold

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Re: photomicrographs or other close-up pictures
« Reply #59 on: February 08, 2010, 12:01:27 PM »
Hi all

Before Gold look this!
 [ Invalid Attachment ]

 


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