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Author Topic: Under Water Placer Find  (Read 37915 times)

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Offline GPEX admin

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  • Larry
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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2009, 10:28:15 AM »
Hi Randy !  Belated welcome to the Forum. Thanks for sharing your exceptionally nice pics, however, if youíd be so kind, Iím sure a lot of our members are curious about the geological setting youíre finding the gold in (not location, but setting). Would the deposit area be of glacial origin, or downstream from a good hardrock deposit, and if the latter, what is the bedrock geology of the deposit location and that of the general area? In a couple of your bedrock photos there appears to be heavy staining of the bedrock. Also, is the bedrock lightly or significantly fractured? And are the fractures parallel or diagonal to the river/streamís course, or crosscutting it? Such indicators may help many of our members zero in on similar geology for a closer look.

Keep the photos coming.

Thanks,
Larry
Somebody said that it couldn't be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That maybe it couldn't but he wouldn't be one
Who'd say so until he had tried.

honeyman76

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2009, 11:34:27 AM »
Wow, that is really neat to see the gold sitting in the crevices! Phenomenal! Its like a national geographic magazine! <-yahoo_> <-yahoo_>

Offline Woodspirit

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2009, 05:08:50 AM »
Randy,

Great pictures and a great find of gold as well. <-good_>

I am curious as to how you built your viewing bucket. I assume the glass is well recessed into the bottom of the bucket so not to scratch the glass. But how do you remove the air bubbles from the exposed under side of the glass?  :-*

Thanks


Offline Vagadero

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2009, 06:23:12 AM »
 {cool^sign}

Offline IdahoGoldGettR

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2009, 11:37:44 AM »
Cheers to you Larry, you have given me a direction to focus on. I agree to all those questions you have mentioned, They need to be addressed so that others will have a better understanding of my mining environment. The Elk City district resides in what is named "The Columbia River" basalts (Miocene period). Though prior to this flow of surface lava, the region consisted then and still today of gneiss granite, quartz outcrops, micaceous schist rock which came during the pre-cambrian Batholith period. The acidic conditions caused by cretacheous granite, brings forth the conditions favaorable for ore deposits. During these periods, the earth was experiencing earth intrusions with mountaious up-rising and lava up-bringing. Through this uplifting, granite & quartz dikes pushed through the earth's crust and revealed gold bearing ore deposits. In a nut shell, the gold in this area does not come from glacial activity. The streams that I work, have had dredging, bucket dragline and hard rock lode mining. The most productive placer areas seem to contain a "rusty color" type granite with molted lava appearance. I have found mica schist rock and quart vein embedded within the granite. When some of this granite is removed, the sides and bottom portions reveal a blackened surface with an iron sepage stain. Some of my banks have this "rust color" seeping into the stream. Though I have yet to work the banks, there seems to be visable worn quartz rocks beneath this sepage. As shown in the below photos, some of the bed rock flooring does extend from the banks. Those that I recover the most placer gold, comes from the "crosscut" sections. These bedrock intrusions flow "crossways" to the river's current. Obviously, these areas provide the best gold traps. Other good gold bearing areas that do not contain the "crosscut" bedrock, are those granite & gneiss rock bottoms that appear to be slightly fractured. Beneath these stones, when removed, you will find the hidden gold that has slid between the cracks & crevices. I rarely work gravels (overburden) that exceed the depth of 3 feet. I am fortunate to work in the high mountainous region where the placer gold has not traveled far and the erosion process has not warrented a stream full of 15 ft. gravels. A recent essay proved that my gold source is very nearby - estimated, 100-200 ft. I have two types of gold here. The heavier showing more wear and the so-called jagged pieces, containing quartz and silver. The latter being found on the overburden surface, gives the indication that they were this Spring's run off. With this said, I look forward to sampling the higher bankings that contain this iron sepage. There are several small springs above these bankings that will also be investigated. I hope this editorial has answered a few questions and that the provided photos have spurred some others, with interest. In time, I will provide close up pictures of the gold taken at this claim and all daily prospects. The last photo shows two hours worth of yesterday's work. I went to my claim to take a few pictures but could not resist the temptation to work several feet of gravel. Any color gained on a photo taking day, is always a "golden day" to me. God bess & best wishes - Randy

Offline IdahoGoldGettR

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2009, 09:53:06 PM »
Hi Woodspirit. I use three types of plexy-glass viewers. First, the "box viewer." A pine wood box with 1x5" boards glued to a clear plexy-glass. To keep this 12"x16" box secure and prevent drifting away, rope is threaded through a heavy pipe (any weight will do), with each end tied to eye hooks. A great surface view finder when opperating in calm water. Secondly, a regular 5 gallon "bucket viewer." Just as easy to make as the first one. Simply cut the plastic bottom and remove completely. Use this cutout as a template when drawing onto the plexy-glass. I suggest making this glass slightly larger so that it rests firmly when glued to the bucket. I then remove the wire bucket handle and replace it with a plastic hand size handle. For quick looks or closer inspections, this one really does the job.  Lastly, I use a similar type "bucket viewer" but with a metal frame; I call this one the "looking glass" bucket. Though I do not have a closeup picture of these, I have provided a picture of one in use (as seen submerged behind me & my wooden sluice - the last photo). This design allows freedom to both hands for underwater prospecting and viewing. At the same token, it can remain stationary when a weight / or your foot, is placed on the bottom plate. Definitely one of the better viewers in my opinion. Because the bucket can be adjusted to the depth preferred, it makes a perfect "looking glass" for photography. An exceptional piece when working in frigid temps. *All buckets & plexy-glass are secured with clear liquid nail glue. I have also found the use of a  circular DW4712 DEWALT 7" DRY-WET DIAMOND MASONRY saw blade works best for cutting the plexy-glass. These retail for less than $20 each and are being advertised on Ebay for half that price. I have also found that these blades cut all types of metal as well. Protective glasses are advised when doing any type of above cutting. Finally when transporting or not in use, a cloth is draped over the plexy-glass portion and secured with a bungi chord for protection.

Offline Woodspirit

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2009, 09:43:07 AM »
Randy,

Thanks for the detailed information and photos.  {cool^sign}

Let's see if I can add this to my wife's honey-do list?  [&whistle#]

Keep the ideas coming.

TJ

Offline CaribooAu

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2009, 11:33:48 AM »
Thanks for the post.....sure is A good one... <-good_>

The one thing that would bug me - where is the gold coming from.......nice pickers like that.. <-thinking->
Have you sampled the benches an hills around that spot......the gold in the creek could be only 20% of what in A older deposit.
Just thought it would be worth A hunt... :D
May The Fever Be With You...


Offline IdahoGoldGettR

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #18 on: October 11, 2009, 09:16:26 AM »
First of all, I'd like to congratulate you on your You Tube videos are in my opinion, fabulous! Not only do you play my kind of music but they are very informative. With that said, I am very honored to have you here taking an interest in this post. You are absolutely right, the source for where these nuggets, pickers and the quartz/gold is coming from, is a bit baffling. I truly believe they didn't come from up stream. I have worked further up and though I have found placer gold, the black sands were light and the small gold was the floating type. To answer you question, no I have not sampled the above bench area yet. This area that is in question however, does have Chinese stacked tailings (dated 1870-1890's) within a small trickling gorge. By the looks of this area, it must have been a very rich spring fed stream at one time. An enormous amount of quartz rock can be seen throughout these tailings. The existing spring today consists of no more than several inches deep, 6-12 inches wide in some places, and very patchy - meaning it appears then disappears beneath trees, tailings and vegetation. What puzzles me even more, is that there was no claim (lode or placer) filed here in the past 150 years. My guess is that the Chinese found a very good spot that others may have over looked. Here is a sample of what the quartz/gold looks like (shown with 1/2 penny weight nuggets).

Offline CaribooAu

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Re: Under Water Placer Find
« Reply #19 on: October 11, 2009, 08:04:34 PM »
Thanks......good to hear you liked the video's....... ;)

You have almost the same gold deposit going on that I'm prospecting up.........I for sure would be doing A grid sample project looking for that lodge.....has to be right under your nose........I have sharp quartz gold in my area an it comes from small quartz veins that are sliding down the hill in A rotten bedrock(greenstone) that has turned to clay........but the one thing I like is how there is 3 types of gold - this hunt will be fun.......found one lodge an still looking for the other 2.......keeps A guy going.... :D

So keep up the hunt an the post...... <-yes_>
May The Fever Be With You...


 


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