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Author Topic: FIRST WEST COAST SHIPWRECK CHART now available!!! (OREGON)  (Read 5386 times)

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ClickTheYellowChick

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FIRST WEST COAST SHIPWRECK CHART now available!!! (OREGON)
« on: July 25, 2009, 03:14:34 PM »
Lost Treasure (JULY 2009, pg 27) provides more background on Ned Reed as well as a look into the future charts he'll be offering.  What is coming from this ambitious research and cartographer should excite the entire shipwreck/treasure hunting community on the west coast of this continent.  

Quoting from Daily Astorian, an Oregon coastal newspaper, LT reveals Reed's database --with 4 others charts due to be released in the near future-- will have documented 14,000 wrecks stretching from the Arctic to Panama when completed.  He's been working on this project for the greater than a decade, compiling the research into a huge database. His database is currently searchable by 12 different criteria.

Beside the Oregon, USA one shown in thumbnail below, Ned has  4 more currently in development.  He's exclusively marketing them from his home in Bandon OR, USA, using is own website. Ned Reed's website The inset in the lower RH portion of the thumbnail clearly indicates which part of the coastal shoreline is covered per map.  The Oregon chart even extends about a third of the way into the Columbia River Gorge which separates the states of Washington and Oregon.

Of special interest to me is the visual detail provided in the upper framed section displaying silhouettes of the ships' types documented in each chart Reed has created.  It appears that Oregon's coastline has hosted no less than 31 different types of vessels, logged in that upper chart frame for documented Oregon shipwrecks.

I personally am waiting with baited breath for the Washington coastal shipwreck, showing the tremendous inlets and outlets from Olympia north to the Canadian border.  Also, intensely interesting to me is the upcoming edition showing the Canadian coastal shipwreck detail around Vancouver Island.  Then I'll be waiting even more breathlessly for the one to be up for sale showing the "elephant trunk" coastal shipwrecks  of southern Alaska.

This is just totally awesome!  The first one is very moderately priced.  I've never met this guy nor heard of him before the LT blurb, but I sure would like to.  WOW!