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Author Topic: High Country Placer Mining  (Read 4167 times)

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Offline GPEX admin

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High Country Placer Mining
« on: January 26, 2008, 12:20:07 PM »
How many venture to placer-prospect the high country?  And your results?
Somebody said that it couldn't be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That maybe it couldn't but he wouldn't be one
Who'd say so until he had tried.

Offline Geo Jim

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Re: High Country Placer Mining
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2008, 11:53:39 PM »
So what is your definition of high country? Above the timber line?

Knowing the north country, I think that most of the high country was glaciated during the ice ages. The glaciers were fairly efficient at scouring away  most of the placer deposits. In high glaciated  country it is mostly bare rock. What placers there are can be found in thin soil layers near the creeks.
Geo Jim
Jim Halloran

Offline Auminer

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Re: High Country Placer Mining
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2008, 09:42:14 PM »
Quote
The glaciers were fairly efficient at scouring away  most of the placer deposits. In high glaciated  country it is mostly bare rock. What placers there are can be found in thin soil layers near the creeks.
Hmmm, good thought Jim.  I haven't done much above timber line and I'll keep this in mind when I do!
Dave

Offline Kootenay Craig

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Re: High Country Placer Mining
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2010, 10:40:53 PM »
Yes, Whats to look for? And where to look for? To start High Country would be 5000ft and higher So  you would have hope to look for bedrock flats or beds below large mountains that hopefuly may have gold veins. Iam still looking...

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: High Country Placer Mining
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2010, 06:46:32 PM »
There are four types of placer deposits that I associate with "high country".
The first is found in the new drainages and seasonal drainage that has intersected either a hardrock deposit upstream or one of the other types of placer. These drainages are so new that they have not cut meanigful channels and have not established regular placer topography. They are often almost straight so no inside curves and no benches etc.
The occurances are placer in nature and do follow the profile of how heavies will deposit just lack the opportunity. Deposits are usually thin and spotty.
Ancient channels can be lifted to elevations significantly above exisiting drainages through regional uplift in mountain building as well as rebound uplift after glacial periods. They are typically pockety and often quite restricted in volume as the ancient channel has been broken up and significantly destroyed by erosional processes during and/or since the upheaval.
Another similar occurance is conglomerate formed from really ancient channels that have become bedrock in the area and lifted by geologic upheaval. If the ancient channel that formed the conglomerate carried gold the conglomerate will. Some conglomerates are more like cemented gravels we find in regular placers and some are hard as heck.
Glacial outwash placer can be made up of hardrock gold liberated directly by the ice and from other placer deposits sampled by the glacier then redeposited in a placer character in the outwash channels. These channels can be perched up high due to their origin or because after the glacier left regional uplift raised it up.
Any of the above can serve as sources of gold thoughout the history of the area in a process of deposition, erosion, and redeposition and concentration.
Anyway just a quick overview but should get the process started.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!