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Author Topic: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?  (Read 246 times)

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Offline upnorth

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Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« on: November 09, 2019, 06:14:12 AM »
From what I've read the Chinese stayed on low paying ground for many years. As long as the ground could keep them in rice and beans, they stayed on it. Back in the early days every 4 months or so a new GOLDRUSH was found in bc, Yukon or Alaska. My 🤔 guess is that they pulled out to find better paying ground, leaving the Fraser area and some ground untouched. I also read that many of the NEW goldrushes were exaggerated by the newspapers, just to SELL more papers.
What ever, this hobby sure gets us reading, and dreaming I suppose.

Offline upnorth

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Re: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2019, 04:53:09 AM »
After more reading it seems that many Chinese joined the railway instead of mining . "In 1858, Chinese immigrants began arriving in the Fraser River valley from San Francisco, as gold prospectors. Barkerville, British Columbia, became the first Chinese community in Canada. By 1860, the Chinese population of Vancouver Island and British Columbia was estimated to be 7,000. Many of the first Chinese immigrants arrived from rural areas in southern China. They laboured under appalling conditions to build the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). Between 1880 and 1885, 15,000 Chinese labourers completed the British Columbia section of the CPR, with more than 600 perishing under adverse working conditions. Largely because of the Trans-Canada railway, Chinese communities developed across the nation."

Offline suburbanator

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Re: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 08:05:05 PM »
Technology and methods of the time didn't allow for near the recovery of today's prospector.

Plus 100,000's of lbs of new gravels and gold washes from the mountains each year.

The Chinese and other miners that swarmed to BC for our gold rush got a lot of the gold,  and certainly all the loose stuff in the top few feet of the ground,   but new gold floods down each year and some of us still manage to find some bigger pieces that were missed before.

If you compare a wooden sluice of 100 years ago to a gold hog high banker today,  I bet we are talking about 25% recovery vs. 95% recovery.   The old wooden systems likely caught 25% of 1000's of ounces,   the rest went back into the river and appeared downstream at a later date.  Just my two grams worth of opinion.



Offline upnorth

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Re: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2019, 08:23:26 AM »
Ya your right,  it's hard to compare the old days with modern technology. I saw on Dan s video that some of his pickers had " rust?" on the outside, "IF "the Chinese used mercury covered  plates, those pieces would not be caught, my guess.

Offline mcbain

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Re: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2019, 08:04:43 PM »
Hi.Upnorth.Mercury was not used to capture gold in the sluice.It was used to separate gold from black sand and is the deadliest  <-sealed_> in the world.Do not use the  <-sealed_> .As Sub.pointed out to days mining is 1000 times what the Chinese had.The minors of old did not even have the simplest tools we use today.Take something as simple as a shovel.They could have made it out of a piece of bent metal and tied a stick to it for a handle.There was no store just down the street.In most cases they worked with nothing but their fingers.They worked relentlessly out of desperation but only scratched the surface in many places.So yes the Fraser still to this day hides many tons of gold.Problem is you have to work to find it.Dan has lucked out on a few claims.Good for him.But even Pickerton could not make him a living.Just trying to make a point about reality.Luck,Mcbain.



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Offline upnorth

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Re: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2019, 04:21:57 AM »
Bill Barlee mentioned the amalgam plates found at Yale ?  The Chinese used (sparingly) mercury in California and Yukon. I've used amalgam plates in a closed circuit at home, maybe that's why my fingernails fell out. Hmm 🤔

Offline JOE S (INDY)

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Re: Why can there still be good ground on the Fraser ?
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2019, 01:01:36 PM »
Yes, cheap Mercury, based on availability, was sometimes used in early sluices in a desperate attempt to capture the finest Gold sizes.  Sometimes, as in beach mining, in a liquid form in an especially constructed tight sided shallow trough put between two riffles, sometimes on copper plates used as amalgam plates and I have even read of an unusual case, during the gold rush in northern Canada, where rows of silver dollars coated in Mercury were used in an attempt to capture the fine Gold.  The basic and practical problem in using Mercury to catch Gold is that the captured Gold makes a lump of amalgam which can (and is) easily knocked loose and then carried out of the sluice by the passage of processing gravels.

Those days and the common, uninformed usage of Mercury are long over - although that legacy still exists today.  Even though loose amalgam (or even liquid Mercury) can infrequently be found from time to time in certain regions.  Because of that possibility, and in applying an abundance of caution, I always check all the Gold I recover for even the slightest traces of it. 

It's nothing to be played with.   <-NO_>
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