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Author Topic: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)  (Read 2081 times)

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Offline BillOfRights

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Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« on: June 17, 2018, 08:38:13 PM »
Mostly granitic gneiss  with other stuff like calcite, iron, quartz... What do you guys think, could this contain gold in your opinion?


















































































Offline mcbain

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2018, 08:58:13 PM »
Hi.BORs.welcome to the site.takes 2 posts to become a member.Nice pics.Good chance you got gold but you got to pan the fine material to see if anything shows or crush and pan some of that rock.Luck,Mcbain.
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

Offline BillOfRights

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2018, 09:06:08 PM »
Hi man, thanks for the greetings and the feeback! I'll probably post another "identify my rock" then.   :D

Offline BillOfRights

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2018, 09:11:17 PM »
I added pictures to the first post. For some reason some got lost.

Offline tonofsteel

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2018, 02:37:03 PM »
Hi BORs and welcome!

I am relatively new to the hobby and will share my experience so far on what I have learned, others may have better practices/ideas but nonetheless:

- Check out the government web pages for reports on the area you are looking in.  Try to figure out what types of rocks and geological formations are found and what types of known mineralization there are in the different areas.  It could be worth looking in areas not reported to have gold but the odds are less in your favor.  If you can find pictures of ore/deposits with known gold in these reports that can also be helpful.

- Many types of deposits have the gold/metal hidden in things like pyrite and require special treatment to get out.  This will not necessarily  show up in a pan after crushing.  Many deposits are also disseminated where the gold is small/microscopic but is dispersed throughout the ore.  Most of the gold in the world that is mined is invisible/microscopic/small.  When crushing and panning classify to multiple screen sizes which will allow you to more easily separate the gold from that fraction of the sample.

- It is hard to evaluate ore when the gold is disseminated.  Stuff like mica/pyrite will appear like gold and it would be more obvious if the ore contained some real visible gold.  But on its own in the original ore chunk it could trick you.   In the pan they wash/float away easily which is why crushing and panning eliminates these false positives.

- I originally posted pictures of mystery rocks/minerals and now I realize it is almost impossible to identify by picture.  I did send in a sample to get assayed (nothing there) to see how the process works.

- Assay is really the only way to know what you really have.  After personally crushing/panning and looking at rocks through a microscope there are many things that can be confused with other things.  Although it is worth crushing and panning as you may have gotten lucky and found ore from a deposit that has pickers/nuggets of gold or platinum.

- After reading many reports from many different areas gold can appear in almost any type of rock.  There can be original quartz deposits (or other disseminated types), alteration (between contact zones of different rock), or secondary enrichment (ie gold dissolved, transported and then deposited in concentration elsewhere when chemical conditions are favorable)   which can all have different effects on different deposits made of different rock.

IMHO anything that catches your eye is worth a sample crush/pan, I would actively look for what has been reported in the past and definitely crush/pan anything found that is similar and if I think I found something that looks like gold (or otherwise valuable) send away for assay to be sure (more so for disseminated/refractory ore).  Obvious gold pickers/nuggets don't really need an assay (maybe testing for fineness)

If the deposits/mines in your area are using mostly gravity separation then crush/pan will be a good idea, but if the mines are using stuff like flotation and cyanide you might need to use more assays to evaluate what you are finding.

A long answer to say I agree with Mcbain.......

Offline BillOfRights

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2018, 03:45:48 PM »
(all post edited)
@tonofsteel Hi man, thanks a lot for the feedback!

 I really do appreciate having this kind of thought provoking comments thrown at me.

Even if I had used the platform before. I overlooked the documentation online for this particular formation! Glad you mentionned it. Turns out there was something done in the old days quite near, about few kilometers out of the current location.

They found up to 0.48g/t Au & 8.59g/t Ag during their sampling in hydrothermal veins. They note the sample comes from mineralized quartz for the gold sample and fine material like sand for the Ag. Minerals may not exactly be the same as what I've shown above , but this looks promising since we now know gold is present in proximity. Furthermore,  the gneiss was also granitic. But only with little mineralization. It appear the geologist are looking at pyrite and chalcopyrite as an indicator for gold in the documents.

Like @mcBain suggested, guess I'll have to equip myself with some sort of device for crushing ore!

How much did you paid for your sample to get assayed?




Offline tonofsteel

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2018, 08:51:51 AM »
Cost for Au/Pd/Pt assay was $30 + $10 for crushing the sample since I sent in un-crushed samples.

Sounds like you did some research and found some clues so sounds good for crushing out some samples.  If you find a vein sample across it (perpendicular) and not just up/down the vein as mineralization can occur in the contact zones between the vein and the country rock.

Have fun with it and come back to let us know what you find!

Offline BillOfRights

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2018, 12:11:09 PM »
Ok thanks for the numbers, it seems resonably affordable. Hope it goes for approximately the same rate in my area.

I always saw pictures of sampling at a perpendicular angle to veins but wondered what was the purpose for it. Now that you mention it, it does makes sense that the mineralization is most likely to occur at the shear zone. I will probably got at it with a sledge hammer, since the main vein is slightly taller than the surrounding rock. For the smaller ones I'll need a rock saw.

I'll you updated. Thanks for the useful information.





Offline mcbain

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2018, 07:18:24 PM »
Wow.That assay was cheap.Lucky to get away with less than 600.00 in B.C. <~ShOcK~> <~ShOcK~>.Luck,Mcbain.
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

Offline BillOfRights

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Re: Could this be gold bearing formation?(photos)
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2018, 06:06:18 PM »
In B.C. the cost of living is slightly higher than the eastern part of canada from others experience , but 600 cad pesos is quite a big deal for one assay. Maybe the laboratory making your assay includes the full element package.

I'd be cool if somebody had a XRF analyser just laying around to rent for quick assay. The new ones are quite acurate for what I've seen. Fast also, the only drawback being the price.

 


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