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Author Topic: Fraser river. Boothroyd  (Read 658 times)

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Offline -PeterPan-

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Fraser river. Boothroyd
« on: November 13, 2017, 10:33:13 AM »
Just wondering your guys thoughts on mining with an excavator on the fraser and how big can you go with placer mining. My claim is good till 2020 the west side is showing better signs of color and is easier to access. I would still have to build a little bit of a road. Or should I buy a claim up in tulameen in stead for what Iím after.

All opinions welcome.

Offline Blue Clay

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2017, 11:49:31 AM »
Just wondering your guys thoughts on mining with an excavator on the fraser and how big can you go with placer mining. My claim is good till 2020 the west side is showing better signs of color and is easier to access. I would still have to build a little bit of a road. Or should I buy a claim up in tulameen in stead for what Iím after.

All opinions welcome.
There are several mechanical mining ops on the Fraser. Some small and a couple a bit bigger. You need to prove up that there are enough values of gold along the whole accessible bar and benches in order to warrant spending money on permitting and mechanical equipment. Fraser is mostly flood gold and some guys make the mistake on the Fraser thinking the gold will get better the deeper they go like is the case in some situations in the gold fields etc..then they find out once the flood layers are mined the gold disappears so some careful testing and calculating the deposit vs the cost of mechanical mining needs to be done. And these days if you are anywhere near native land you may have issues there with them and the government. They aren't only trying to keep miners from mining actual reserves anymore. They are even trying to halt exploration/mining on lands adjacent to their lands. A whole other can of worms.

Offline -PeterPan-

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2017, 12:12:46 PM »
Good to know. Maybe tulameen or quesnel are better options. I would love to buy some land and rights up in the Yukon maybe after the kids grow up. Lol

Offline Blue Clay

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2017, 12:34:55 PM »
Good to know. Maybe tulameen or quesnel are better options. I would love to buy some land and rights up in the Yukon maybe after the kids grow up. Lol
All three of those areas have very different geology and types of grounds to work, depths to bedrock, pay layer types, etc..The Yukon's accessible grounds with good gold values are claimed up by speculators (claim flippers) and mining companies, etc..There are still some ops that can try to make money running top layer gravels that were put aside by bigger ops that didn't run them cause they wanted the higher pay gravels beneath those layers. Some areas in the Yukon have been mined two even three times in the same areas. Even hard to access virgin ground areas are claimed up. There are some areas you could claim but again in the Yukon there are reasons why some areas aren't claimed. It's a whole different ball game up there than in the Cariboo for mining.

Mechanical mining is a serious venture that needs a lot of consideration before diving into. Consider this: 80% or more of mining ventures fail. Why? Lot's of reasons. But one of the major reasons is trying to mechanically mine ground with unproven gold deposit values. The most experienced miners I know (40 years in the field) spend a shit load of time and money testing and proving up the land before getting neck deep in bigger equipment, bigger expenses, and more drama and stress with trying to run an op with peoples personalities to deal with on top of all the mining and logistical concerns to consider.

Offline -PeterPan-

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2017, 12:44:21 PM »
Definitely agree. Just trying to get some ground to run and prospect is the hardest part so far. It seems every claim is owned and the only way is to be on the ball at 10:00 and hope they forget to renew

Offline Blue Clay

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2017, 12:46:48 PM »
Definitely agree. Just trying to get some ground to run and prospect is the hardest part so far. It seems every claim is owned and the only way is to be on the ball at 10:00 and hope they forget to renew
Where do you live? What mining area are you closest too?

Offline -PeterPan-

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2017, 03:16:58 PM »
I live in aldergrove but I am willing to drive anywhere.

Offline Blue Clay

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2017, 05:18:48 PM »
I live in aldergrove but I am willing to drive anywhere.
When you are going to investigate and consider certain areas to hobby prospect/mine with potential of further more serious mining do a lot of research into the area you are considering. Look at old historic reports of where gold was found. Then look up those areas on the MTO maps and see where old legacy claims were and still are. Look further into work reports that were done on those areas by miners/prospectors. Check government archive reports on areas known for gold. Check logging road maps and where access was historically for areas that got mined and newer areas that may only have new access areas/roads cut into them. If you can find some new access areas put into the gold field areas then your chances of finding virgin ground increases. Not that the old timers didn't horse, walk, and mule their way into the back woods but the facts are that certain areas got most of the concentration of prospectors/miners back in the day and those same areas are where mechanical miners looked to set up ops because they, with mechanical means could did further and deeper more easily than the old timers did.  Then investigate the geology of the area and what type of ground is the historic gold found in and the more recent discoveries found in. This will dictate what kind of tools, equipment is needed to prospect and mine those same areas. Gold is found in lot's of different types of deposits from bedrock, old channel, glacier till, buried valley and mountainous gulley's etc. Trying to get an understanding of what type of ground you will be working and how the gold runs in the area will increase your chances of using more successful methods of finding and extracting gold from that kind of deposit.

Here's another heads up that makes real miners get a good laugh from all the pictures of internet gold getting posted all over the place. Every wonder why real miners don't comment on when people post riduculous pictures of big amounts of gold they say they got from sluicing a creek by hand? Cause we know it's complete crap and BS.
When you see guys posting pictures of their pans full of gold, and big chunks of gold from creeks and areas we all know please understand these guys and pictures are complete BS and don't fall for any of it. If there were those kinds of deposits out there mining companies would have cleared them out long, long, long ago. Or the prospector would sell every possession they had to mine it out lol.
It's very easy for anyone to buy placer gold off the internet now a days and take pictures of it in their pans and in their sluice boxes and claim they found it on their claim. Truth is that's just not the truth and is laughable by guys who know what's up.
Fact is real miners mining for a living are running ground that pays anywhere from $2 to $15/yard on the average on decent claims in the Cariboo, Kooteney's, or on the Fraser and even in the Yukon and Alaska. etc..Yes off course deposits can pay better than that if some rich pockets are found etc but I'm just speaking of an average. And yes, there are some richer grounds in some areas but again, just an average we'll talk about here.

So think about that for a minute.... How many 5 gallon buckets in a yard of gravel? Around 35 to 40 buckets. Give or take. How many grams is $10 of gold? Approx 1/4 th to 1/5 th of a gram based on approx 84% gold purity (an average % of BC type gold)...So, that is a say 1/4th of a gram of gold spread out in approx 35 to 40  five gallon buckets. Now do the math on what that works out to for how much gold that would be in each bucket of gravel based on the $10/yard....Lets use 38 buckets/yard for this math...We have to convert grams to grains of gold cause the amount is so small per bucket ok...
1/4 of a gram/yard=3.86 grains/yard divided by 38 buckets=.102 grains of gold per bucket. Converted that to grams that would = .0066 grams per bucket of gravel that mechanical miners are running and can make a profit at if ran efficiently.  Now think about how minuscule that amount of gold is per bucket...Yet you see yahoo's all over the internet on forums, facebook, youtube, and prospecting groups posting pictures of big nuggets and pans full of gold after running a little bit of surface gravel through their hand ran sluices and high bankers....Complete and utter BS everywhere on the internet. It happens here on this forum by a couple guys on a regular basis too.  Sorry but guys thinking about mining to make money at need a reality check and need to be spoken to with transparency and honesty.
A common gold per yard goal in the industry you may have heard mentioned on t.v. or on the internet by miners is "an ounce per hundred yards" to make a mechanical mine pay.  That works out to 31.1 grams (troy ounce) divided by 100 yards= .31 gram/yard x 84% gold purity (a BC average)= .26 gram of pure gold value =$13.57/yard at todays spot gold price in CND....But gold buyers don't buy at spot prices. They have to make a profit so they will buy a fair bit below that.

Hopefully I didn't confuse the heck out of you but I think you get my points. Do your due diligence or you may find yourself putting the cart before the horse.

Offline johnedoe

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2017, 07:30:09 AM »
 <~ShOcK~> Reality rears it's ugly head..... <-shock_>
Great write up there Blue Clay..... [-1st-]
So many people don't consider the reality of mining .

Offline Blue Clay

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Re: Fraser river. Boothroyd
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2017, 09:57:31 AM »
<~ShOcK~> Reality rears it's ugly head..... <-shock_>
Great write up there Blue Clay..... [-1st-]
So many people don't consider the reality of mining .
Thank you Johnedoe. I really appreciate that. Great youtube vids by the way!