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Author Topic: GPS  (Read 6043 times)

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Offline NickD

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GPS
« on: April 30, 2016, 08:22:57 AM »
Does anyone here use GPS devices?

I thought it could be helpful to find my way back to promising outcrops (I'm mostly focussing on hard-rock here in Ontario) since it's mostly dense forest and easy to get disoriented. I could be helpful for doing a bit of local mapping too if it's accurate enough. That's the thing though, I'm not sure if GPS devices are accurate enough (especially under thick forest cover) to be worth the bother.

Online jobinyt

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Re: GPS
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2016, 08:32:55 PM »
Common consumer grade GPS is not accurate enough for survey work. Beyond that though, for relocating something it'll work fine. For going to coordinates you've taken from a map the limitation is likley more getting an  accurate coordinate than the ability of the GPS.  Most units give te ability to avarage a positions coordinates - just let the system sit there a couple minutes and those things that tend to cause the coordinates shift slightly average out. Even so, I've seem some day-to-day variations that cause concern in setting/taking claim posts. So, not perfect, but highly useful, good enough for don't-get-lost uses, very helpful for finding benchmarks and such, and if you're patient and double/triple check your results, good enough for anything you're likely to want that doesn't require a certified survey. Also, looking at a bunch of waypoints on your screen can reveal things you might not realize wandering around on the ground. And oh boy, in flat/featureless country they are grand.

Offline NickD

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Re: GPS
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2016, 08:38:29 PM »
Thanks for the answer.

I generally can figure out where I am give or take a couple hundred meters, and when I can't, I can still find my way out of the woods. However, it's happened once or twice that I couldn't find my way back to a small outcrop, and more importantly, having a hard time getting a feel for where all the outcrops are in relation to each other, ex is it multiple outcrops of the same vein, or multiple parallel veins; or helping pin-point geological contacts and faults. So it wouldn't be for any official surveys, just for my own purposes like benchmarks.

Offline steve 009

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Re: GPS
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2016, 09:05:43 AM »
Good Morning Ore Hunter I was wondering which GPS you would recommend as I am looking to buy one Thank You Steve

Offline azau

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Re: GPS
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2016, 10:55:32 AM »
Does anyone here use GPS devices?

I thought it could be helpful to find my way back to promising outcrops (I'm mostly focussing on hard-rock here in Ontario) since it's mostly dense forest and easy to get disoriented. I could be helpful for doing a bit of local mapping too if it's accurate enough. That's the thing though, I'm not sure if GPS devices are accurate enough (especially under thick forest cover) to be worth the bother.

GPS signals are radio waves and travel easily through trees.   According to the following  the accuracy is within 20 to thirty feet and probably good enough to allow you to get close enough to re-find geological features  http://www.gps-basics.com/faq/q0116.shtml
If you have traveled a pretty fair distance since last turning it on then you may need to turn it on and let it sit for a while to let it re-orient itself.  Box canyons may hinder signal reception since the device needs a line of sight view to at least three satellites and the canyon walls may block out some satellites that would be viewed in a less steep and tight terrain.
Choose a GPS that is within your budget  as the main differences are usually for features that you may not need or use.

PS:  My, probably now 20 to 25 year old, Magellan is my favorite and most amazing toy ever along with being extremely useful.   

Offline GoldRetrieving

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Re: GPS
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2016, 05:39:17 AM »
A GPS will certainly help with your prospecting plan and understanding the lay of the land. You will be surprised when you enter coordinates for outcrops and take sometime to study them and look for connections. I never leave home without it.
I have had two Garmins over the years, they have served me well mounted on snowmobile, atv and belt carried.
GR  <-good_>

Offline Norbert77

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Re: GPS
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2016, 06:46:08 AM »
Once I knee the area I wanted to stake, I put the coordinates into Garmin basecamp,  moved it to my garmin 62 s, then head out with the gps and a good compass. 

I set my track from post 1 to post 2, then I had a nice solid line that I could follow over hilly, rough terrain.  The first day I only covered 600 meters, it worker well enough, but a compass is a must because the garmin internal compass over time reverts to magnetic  north instead of true north; my position was 10.4 degrees of for true  Orth,  and sometimes if I looked on my claim line I'd  notice it wasn't taking me in the direction it had been.  On the screen I could see when I ventured off the track too, at least that part worked.  I found that once every few hour I had to do a compass calibrate procedure.
Once used to touch screen units the rudimentary button were a pain to get used to, especially for inputting data, but it worked out alright.  My one claim was only out 2 meters it's length, the long one, over 2 km, it was out 5 meters between corner post 2 and 3 because trees suitable to make posts  were not as available as I would have liked.

The 62s has an external antenna, supposed to be much better than internal ones.  And the screen is thicker than a touch screen, no need to worry about breaking it when dropping, which happens when you're carrying chainsaws, compass, backpack, and other gear.

The 62st is more and has an I ternary topography map.  Save your money and buy a Backroad Mapbook for your province, much, much better.  It lists old abandoned logging roads and trails and more- really is worth checking out

Offline mcbain

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Re: GPS
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2016, 07:19:01 PM »
Hi.Guys.A little humour here.A good silva ranger with the correct declination setting for your area  will not drive you off the dock into the salt chuck.Your feet will let you know.Luck Mcbain.
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

Offline HauntedxAu

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Re: GPS
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2017, 10:20:24 AM »
Inreach Explorer. Now owned by Garmin. New product released Feb 2017. Also allows for satellite communication, texting only. 

http://www.inreachcanada.com

Offline mcbain

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Re: GPS
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2017, 07:40:38 PM »
Got a gps story?Lets hear it.Last summer I came across some asian tourists.Totally lost.They waved me down.All spoke excellent English so no problems talking.They set their GPS for hells gate and ended up on my claim on highway 5, the coq.Miles out of there way.I told them they had to go back to Hope and take hwy#1.Buy this time they were very confused and did not know where Hope was.I asked if they could read a map.The older gent said he could.I showed them where we were at and where they had to go.The old gent said he had it figured out and wanted to buy the map.I gave it to him and said enjoy your trip and never trust a GPS to work.He agreed and in a whole bunch of gibberish tore his son a new one.Luck Mcbain
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

 


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