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Author Topic: The Science Journal Series Introduction  (Read 13701 times)

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Offline GPEX admin

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  • Larry
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The Science Journal Series Introduction
« on: January 20, 2012, 09:31:40 AM »

The Science Journal Series Introduction

Tell ya a short story - I remember as a young lad of 19 when in the Navy, during basic training, after lights-out, this chap in the next bunk and I used to toss far-out thoughts around, just to see what sense could be made out of some of the most intriguing things.  Scientists, of sorts, you might say. 

So as to speak, how about you folks now being, Scientists of the Mind?  For this, let us restrict posts to be only that which would be considered not of standard consideration but rather falls into the spectrum of wondrous.  In other words, identifying problems for creating solutions.  And I feel all outcome would be best deserving of their own range of categories, fostered under one primary parent Board, entitled, The Science Journal.  I will speak with Dave about creating such a Board and will eventually move all applicable threads there under.  Everyone is welcome to reply and create new topics, and for their titles, let us use the prefix The Science Journal - then comes your topic heading.  By example, the new thread which I now start, in following - - The Science Journal - Metal/Gold Detectors

Within this Series, to enable the mind to work its best, drift into a totally relaxed state, vision that you are starring up from your pillow into the darkness - - permit your mind to explore far beyond superficial boundaries, just to see where all it goes.  Im sure we will be fascinated with the outcome.

Somebody said that it couldn't be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That maybe it couldn't but he wouldn't be one
Who'd say so until he had tried.

Offline d7kaylor

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2012, 05:13:57 PM »
I'm new to this site.  I'm looking for help.  I have an old plating kit with transformer and 4 bottles of plating solutions. One qt. each, of Gold, Silver, copper, and a stripping solution.   How can I harvest the gold from the solution ?  Dan

Offline Meh

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2012, 09:22:41 AM »
Do you know what the solutions are made of?

If the gold is in a AuCl3, or HAuCl4 solution, you can drop the gold with the addition of sodium metabisulphite (available at home brewing stores) or just cement it out with the addition of copper. If the solution is something more exotic, you might be better off asking over on the gold refining forum.

Offline bobinsk

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Re: The Science Journal - Chemical Separation
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2012, 07:47:57 PM »
As a "new" topic - could we consider an in-depth look at fine gold separation from black sand using chemicals rather than mechanical means ?
Hopefully that fits the bill to be in the "Science Journal" section. I have tried the other forum and there seems to be a mind-set that there is no way to use chemicals to get the gold away from. say, magenetics when you pull the mags out of black sands. There is usually a lot of gold under the microscope hanging on to and mixed in with the mags.
Try all the surfactants you want, some of it still hangs on. Any thoughts ?

Offline GPEX admin

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2012, 08:32:23 PM »

No chatter on mercury, please.  This Forum listing is open to public view.
Somebody said that it couldn't be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That maybe it couldn't but he wouldn't be one
Who'd say so until he had tried.

Offline ncgoldpanner

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Re: The Science Journal - Chemical Separation
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2012, 12:40:48 PM »
As a "new" topic - could we consider an in-depth look at fine gold separation from black sand using chemicals rather than mechanical means ?
Hopefully that fits the bill to be in the "Science Journal" section. I have tried the other forum and there seems to be a mind-set that there is no way to use chemicals to get the gold away from. say, magenetics when you pull the mags out of black sands. There is usually a lot of gold under the microscope hanging on to and mixed in with the mags.
Try all the surfactants you want, some of it still hangs on. Any thoughts ?

Have you tried processing the black sand thru a hammer mill?  An impact mill does not grind fine gold but shatters the black sands.  The gold will then walk out from the fine black sand on a good shaking table or in your pan. 

Another way to recover gold from black sands is to progressively reduce the size of the black sand via a roll mill.  Set the rolls to reduce the material to half its' size.  This process requires prescreening at each step.  The gold flattens and the hard material shatters so that when rescreened at the same size only malleable material (like gold) is retained.  Repeat the process with smaller sieve sizes.  If it still has much gold in it when everything goes thru 230 mesh there are three additional options. 
1.  Chemical leach 
2.  Flotation 
3. Oil-coal agglomeration





Offline bobinsk

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2012, 08:51:55 PM »
I like your thinking. I forgot about my roller mill. I will have to wait for winter to be over before trying, so it looks like May or June before I can try it.

On the other hand, I've never heard of the Oil-Coal Agglomeration you talk about.

Any helpful hintsa on where to source that information to at least see what it entails ?

Thanks for your input.
Bob

Offline ncgoldpanner

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2012, 05:57:21 AM »
Check this link:  http://www.saimm.co.za/Journal/v100n01p057.pdf

The coal used in these tests was of a very poor quality.  It had 40% ash. 

Also check out this link.  Agglomeration | GOLD METALLURGY

Total loading is about 10 to 14 g/Kg of agglomerate.  Trying to load above this level does not payoff unless you have high head grades of feed stock (>10g/T).  Unlike mercury this process can recover 2 micron gold particles.


Offline muffles

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2012, 08:13:51 PM »
Gonna throw a few things here. im very new to the gold recovery and as well to this forum. i have noticed for this part that some basics as to wieghts of gold plat etc should be expressed as well as the melting of gold with the burning off of mercury that is very heath hazarding.

Offline ping

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Re: The Science Journal Series Introduction
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2013, 08:41:34 AM »
if the ph has to be 1 before dropping with smb, then why dont you have to evaporate the excess bleach off when it has a ph of 12-14 @ 75-80 degrees f