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Author Topic: Backpackers sluices  (Read 2609 times)

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Offline Gilhaven

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Backpackers sluices
« on: June 24, 2015, 01:17:44 PM »
Hi all, just wondering what some good backpackers sluice boxes are out on the market under the $200 mark?  Folding would be nice but im not preferential to one.

Thanks!

Offline Goldcrow

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2015, 01:23:16 PM »
Welcome, Gilhaven. Sluicing 'in the stream' is a no-no in BC, as you probably know.  :) There are lots of vids on DIY units, some are really good.
Work smart..and hard

Offline Gilhaven

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2015, 02:11:48 PM »
Lol...my bad.  Ive been watching too many diy youtube videos (usa)where they just set up a sluice and start.  However it does seem odd that you ca pan a bucket of material and end up with just as much silt as you would if you sluiced a bucket of material....just takes longer.  Oh well...glad i posted before spending $$ on a sluice.  Thanks again.

Offline mcbain

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2015, 07:54:06 PM »
hi. Gill we all no it is not legal and you will not find anything under 200.00 most are filled with expanded metal and floor carpet a waste of money. build your own what you use it for is your busness.Luck mcbain.make sure you are not on a claim without permission.
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

Offline sunshine

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2015, 09:32:16 PM »
Last time I checked, the Le Trap was about $100 CDN.  It is a plastic sluice, that needs a good flow of water.  It is 16" x 48" and about 4 lbs.  It is easy to set up, easy to clean up and in my opinion works well.  I don't see why you could not MacGyver something out of it if you want to make it shorter or two pieces to fit in backpack (or buy a longer backpack).   
See my YouTube channel for fun amateur video:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnz8kX6AZOeZbRt0F9XqVJA

Offline JOE S (INDY)

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2015, 02:58:07 AM »
Having used Le Trapps over the years I can possibly cast a bit of light on why there are advantages in converting one into a highbanker.

Lets start with an in stream version of the Le Trapp (a "Stream Robber" version).  Where legal the in stream version is excellent on processing low volumes of bank run material.  The big stumbling block with Le Trapps is that they can have trouble handling higher volumes of bank run material.  You can overwhelm them with too much material which has only stream flow to work through the volume of material including large oversize material.  They shine when working smaller inputs of material but can easily be overwhelmed when it comes to 'spirited shoveling'.

A highbanker, incorporating a "Bank Robber" version of a Le Trapp (and using a grizzly), can process more material because the washed input material is classified to remove the volume of the oversized rock.  If (lets say) 2/3 of your bank run material is removed through classification by the grizzly then the volume of 'spirited shoveling' input material can be increased to a higher level (lets say an additional 50%).

Add to that the ability to move the highbanker closer to the excavation site with all the water needed available through the use of a pump and the benefits really start to pile up.

Joe
Wiser Mining Through Endless Personal Mistakes

Offline beav

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2015, 06:13:44 PM »
Joe,

I agree with 110% of what you have stated about the LeTrap! Simply can't be beat with comparable equipment.

Beav

Offline brotherjames

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2015, 11:12:01 AM »
I have used the Angus MacKirk grubstake as a clean up sluice and have always wanted to build a little frame with a gravity feed  for use in places with significant drop. Love how compact they are and easy to clean. Not much water needed either. I am using a
small pond pump . <-good_>
Cheers - BJ.
Doing my part to rid the rivers of BC of their black sand.

Offline the gold guy

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Re: Backpackers sluices
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2017, 08:06:32 AM »
I have built backpack sluice that is designed for micron gold and full on production will be on the market soon .