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Author Topic: Bilge Pump Batteries  (Read 4361 times)

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Offline AuTiger

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Bilge Pump Batteries
« on: September 02, 2014, 04:53:32 PM »
My old 12v batteries have finally given up, use them in my yard only for Bilge pumps. Should I go with Deep-Cycle?, or what do most of you fellows use? I run 300/500/750GPH pumps only!! Thanks

Offline diamond jim

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2014, 06:23:55 PM »
How long do you typically run?
Jim

Offline AuTiger

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2014, 07:20:53 PM »
I can fool around and use up 5 or 6hrs, depending on what I'm doing. I didn't get an hours worth today on a supposedly fully charged car battery, using the Brawn cleanup table. I checked D/C marine batterys @ crappy tire on the net, not cheap and nothing you would want to pack around in the bush!!

Offline mcbain

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2014, 08:04:11 PM »
hi. check out some deep cycle batteries and a small solar charger.the solar chargers are quite cheap the batteries are quite heavy.Forget crappy tire. You can save alot of money by simple contacting a battery rep such as interstate or rep of your choice.they will go out of their way too get you best and most cost effient battery system.if you have a problem i could set you up with a intrstate rep.luck mcbain.
I started out with nothing Istill have most of it.

Offline diamond jim

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2014, 08:06:42 PM »
If you don't have to "start" anything, you get the best performance from golf cart batteries. They are now made in 12 volt....used to be you could only get them in 6 volt, which required hooking two in series. The downside of lead-acid, is of course, weight. The advantage is lots of storage capacity, so you can run all weekend, or longer, without re-charging.
 On the lighter weight side you have all the high-tech batteries, including NiCad, Nimh, and lithium ion. I recently had to do a bunch of battery research, as I was needing a couple of 12 volt packs for my fluorescent light setup. I ended up going with 'D' size NiCad packs, which gives me 5 amp/hours per pack. I could have had more capacity with NIMH, but I went with NiCad because I was drawing them down at a fast pace.....about 40% of the capacity per hour. NiCad's excel at that. They're also a little cheaper to buy.
 I tested my 750GH pump after I read your post. Mine draws 1.1 amps under load. So, my NiCad pack would run it for about 4 hours. I bought a charger for my packs that runs off a 12v deep-cycle battery, or my pickup system. That lets me have the portability of the NiCad, but keeps me in the field for several days. All of this, of course, wasn't cheap. I built my own packs, using 10 'D' size NiCads in each. The batteries cost me $255.00. The high-tech charger was another $50 on sale. So I have about $300.00 in the two packs. A good 12volt golf-cart battery will run you about $250.00.
 Another cost of the high-tech batteries is that you shouldn't run them flat. The NiCads last the longest if not drawn down below 1.0 volts/battery, or 10 volts fore the pack. The NIMH is a little lower at .8 volts/battery. So, if you don't voltage check them occasionally, you're in danger of reducing their life. I built a little battery alarm, from a kit, that I can set the alarm voltage to 10 volts. That lets me know when it's time to change packs. Even the lead-acid do the best when their discharge is limited to about 50%. Fully charged, they're at 12.6. When they hit 50%, they read 12.0 with no load applied. You can run them more, but it shortens their lifespan.
 Before you spend big bucks, you should do some research, so you spend your money well.
Jim

Offline ebuyc

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2014, 09:17:12 PM »
My old 12v batteries have finally given up, use them in my yard only for Bilge pumps. Should I go with Deep-Cycle?, or what do most of you fellows use? I run 300/500/750GPH pumps only!! Thanks

I love my 35ah sealed batteries!


a 750gph should only be a few amps - so 10+ hrs runtime...

Deep cycle batteries are heavy and overkill. Plus if you leave them dead very long it is damaging to them.
The sealed gel batteries achilles heal is they can not be charged over 14volts without damage.

These little UB12350 fit in a bucket real nice  <-thinking->
You can fit two in one bucket if you like...

So as to solar panels... you still need a battery in between generally.
Most solar panels regulate at  24v...
So my pumps run 4 to 7 amps... A watt is voltage * current(amps). a 100watt panel can produce 100/24 ~= 4.1amps in IDEAL conditions.
So for me if I wanted to run my 2200gph pump which draws around 7 amps I would need a panel rated for DOUBLE that for poor light conditions OR no battery.
So I would need a 336watt panel... good luck carrying that to the creek. I do have a 100Watt panel but it is best left at camp for charging EXTRA batteries ;)


My 2 bits...
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Offline diamond jim

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2014, 09:25:51 PM »
I didn't notice you only used them in your yard. If that's the case, just get a battery charger, and run your pump from that. It mat help to also have a cheap battery hooked to the charger at the same time...to act as a buffer.
Jim

Offline AuTiger

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2014, 09:42:41 AM »
Good replys, thanks fellows! A 750GPH pump draws 3amps, if I can get +/- 10hrs run time on a battery such as EbuyC's , I think I'll go that way, sounds like decent weight and size, I might even be able to find one in the Dysfunctional town I live near instead of running into the city, gotta get one, the season is getting shorter here everyday!

Offline AuTiger

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2014, 05:51:30 AM »
Morning EbuyC, could you please post the dimensions of the 35AH, when time permits? Thanks

Offline ebuyc

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Re: Bilge Pump Batteries
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2014, 05:55:20 AM »
Morning EbuyC, could you please post the dimensions of the 35AH, when time permits? Thanks

Width:    5.16 in.   
Length:    7.68 in.
Height:    6.14 in.

Weight:    23.2 lbs.

LMGTFY
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