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Author Topic: Rock identification  (Read 6230 times)

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Offline EMF

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2014, 09:35:01 AM »
Jasper can be colored green, and also yellow and most commonly red. But jasper is too hard to scratch with a knife. It is a form of quartz, made of a mass of tiny crystals, and as a result a bit harder to shatter than common quartz. In your specimen, the lighter colored material is most likely to be a carbonate mineral, a common associate with serpentinite. Muriatic acid will cause bubbllng if it is touched to carbonate minerals and is a common test for such.

Offline Mar-Kea

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2014, 08:36:46 PM »
Ok.  Now I know how to check the hardness too. Lol. Thanks for the help. Whisk you were here, my moms yard is full of rocks we've collected that were not sure of. Except the obsidian. Thsnks again.

Mar-Kea

Offline Johnnydanger

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2014, 08:56:29 PM »
I was out gold mining with my husband on the North Saskatchewan River and found this cool rock in his sluice.
It's shiny and when I scratched the tile it was a faint white line.
I think Quartz scratched it, having a hard time seeing scratches on it, the nail scratch wiped off.
I did the salt water float test for amber and it didn't float.
I would appreciate help figuring out what it might be?






Offline Johnnydanger

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2014, 09:05:14 PM »
Here are a few more pictures of it under the light







Offline aumbre

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2014, 09:10:52 PM »
A concretion ?

Offline Johnnydanger

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2014, 06:17:44 PM »
How would I be able to tell if it's a concretion?

Offline aumbre

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2014, 02:56:19 PM »
Probably not a concretion which is just a nodule like mineral that has formed by layering sort of like a pearl.
Ive seen that kind of thing before- in W. New Mexico and also E. Oregon but I can't remember what they are called. I think they are kind of like an agate perhaps formed in cavities by solution. Don't think they are too uncommon and someone should be able to ID.

Offline EMF

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2014, 12:58:16 PM »
That is a nodule of clear chalcedony. It is the same mineral as agate, but without the layered colors that would make it agate. The hardness is typically between 6.5 and 7, so quartz can scratch it, but not easily. Try looking at it under UV light. Sometimes chalcedony glows with some bright colors in those conditions. It might make a nice looking cabachon.

Offline ronnymcc

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Re: Rock identification
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2014, 11:32:54 AM »
It looks like serpentine to me. I found some up around Dease lake area. I also talked to a person at the jade mine at Hogem mtn; he showed me several samples of jade and serpentine. Your description fits serpentine. :) :) :)