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Author Topic: Gold ní Clay  (Read 57303 times)

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Offline matscards

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #50 on: February 17, 2010, 11:19:36 PM »
don't know if c-4 will get the gold out but it will get the clay sure as heck <-thinking->

Offline juu907

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #51 on: February 18, 2010, 12:17:28 AM »
dont laugh my boy is legal to use the stuff. hopefully it will be busted up enough that i can just add water and a small amount of easy stirring and here comes the yellow.

Offline chadjensen

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #52 on: February 19, 2010, 08:51:14 AM »
So I have been thinking. I had a friend that had a ball/rod mill he made himself. Great setup. This guy was awesome when it came to manufacturing homemade mining equipment. Well It got me to thinking could you make a trommel that had a ball mill in the first couple of feet or so(.66 to 1 meter)? Have a plate with slots cut in it that would let the fines and stirred up clay through and go to a really fine screen section. Or the screen section may not bee necessary. But this guys set up was awesome. and it would work great for our purposes. He used it dry to crush 8 inch (20 cm) or so rocks down to a fine powder. He had a long tube with a ball mill and a slotted plate he made and welded in there.  The plate was about two feet down or so and would hold the rocks and let only the crushed stuff through. Well the last part of the crusher was the rod mill and it would crush the ore down to a flour consistency he used it for smelting but hey if we just used the ball mill part you could run it wet and it would bust up rock and clay and give you a nice feed for a sluice. Let me know your guys thoughts.

Offline dharr79

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #53 on: March 23, 2012, 01:06:43 AM »
All the gold bearing area's I go to have more clay then you can shake a stick at...and the thick mucky clay is the worst
but worst... best gold seems to come from it...acts like a false bedrock.
 
I live in wisconsin in the bluffs and it is solid clay here. I find all my gold from 6 feet down all the way to bedrock in the clay. the amounts have been getting better the closer I get to bedrock but it's still in clay.

Offline overtheedge

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #54 on: March 23, 2012, 10:23:06 AM »
Wow, old thread. Here is what I've noticed and my interpretation.

I work the Tonsina River on the south end the Copper River Basin in Alaska. It is a glacial stream with glaciers upstream about a 100-150 kilometers as a crow flies. Lots of silt/clay content during high water periods even though there is a glacial lake between the glacier and me. Less during low water, but there is still a lot picked up by bank erosion. The gold is flaky and most is in the 250-500 micron rage with the very largest  rarely over 1.5mm.

During the summer, the water level is highly variable with max depth occurring shortly after rain on the glacier. Sunny days raise the water level some. Longer periods of cloudiness and the water level drops. The point being the variability of water depth during the season.

The clay is blue-gray, but fired in a kiln turns red. It sticks to everything when wet. While the clay is saturated, fine gold sinks just a bit into it (a few mm to a couple cm), but no more. The almost daily variability of water depth can add some sand and gravel, but almost immediately more silt/clay gets added to the layering. This only occurs in the shallows as the main current is too turbulent and fast for the flour gold/sand/silt/clay to drop out. Although an extreme velocity drop will leave this on the skim bars immediately adjacent to the main channel.

I am not an artist at all. My stick-man drawings even look bad, so I try to point out illustrations in books to describe some things, so from Tom's book, "The Modern Goldseekers Handbook", look at drawing OGD-1-A, see spots #7 & #9 just below the cliff. These are the areas where the gold gets dropped out and with the lowering water depth, it gets covered with a layer of silt/clay.

Without any bedrock, the stream-bed at this point is altered by real high water piling up boulders which are the beginning of a bar. Each pulse of high water fills in the gaps between the boulders. The thing to notice in this scenario is that the sedimentation is on the lower outside of the corner. The more variable the water depth, the greater the mix of boulders, cobbles, sand and silt/clay.

This is the nature of glacial streams. The strata can be layered or it can look like a mix of rounded till with clay/silt/sand throughout the mix.

Because only high water can move the boulders, one place I look at is where large boulders are visible with a heavy clay coating. The problem is silt/clay water content. Dry means mechanical break-down before using water. Soggy wet washes fairly easily with higher pressure water. I haven't found an easy way to deal with just damp other than a launder. It is nasty to try to wash. Oh for a really portable pressure washer;1500-2000psi. But I would have to have a great filter for the intake.

The insides of corners only have much gold if there is large rocks and boulders at the head. Small cobble tends to be lean and the gold rarely is bigger than 150 micron.

Further south from me, the time since the last active glacial period has left these deposits in old channels that might be meters to hundreds of meters above the water course. The consequent dryness means you gotta work to get a decent sample. I would suggest using an impact mill on dry material if you find a deposit with good tenure. NO WATER until it is fairly powdered. These same old channels can contribute to deposits downstream if there is active erosion.

Hope this helps a bit.
eric

Offline AuExplorer

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #55 on: March 29, 2012, 09:48:56 PM »
Excellent Thread

  Clays are mother natures ball mill slimes allowed to settle. Don't forget to check the silts gentlemen and ladies, as silt is the prelude to clay and is easier to work with for fine gold. I have to agree with admin, as most of the bigger materials and benches are deposited in most cases by other means. Ultra fine gold; silt or clay streaks have a different mechanic when it comes to natural deposition. The concept of silt or clay being a percentage by weight precious metal, is lost to most prospectors today in North America. If I was to ask, if you would like to pan the slimes from a working gold mines ball mill, Most responses would be "yes". If I was to ask you if you wanted to go pan or puddle some silts or clays, the answer in most cases today is, "it is not worth my time". What I dont understand is, why not from Mother Natures natural ball mill. The whole concept of crushing our material to slimes came from clay. Excellent thread and I am very curious to see the outcome. When I am prospecting a new location, the first place I head is not the gravels as the clays and silts will tell me exactly what the predominate mineral deposits are for that localized system and wether it is worth my time to keep bird dogging that canyon. It will also tell me previous mining activity and methods used in alot of cases.

     

Offline tamarackman

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #56 on: March 30, 2012, 03:38:54 PM »
Too much info must take a break and read the rest later Great thread

Offline Troy#

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #57 on: March 30, 2012, 08:08:12 PM »
Just re-reading my copy of Taggarts 1945, Handbook of Mineral Dressing, and he lists dozens of placer mines in it many of them have clay listed as "the base".
chadjensen: "Well It got me to thinking could you make a trommel that had a ball mill in the first couple of feet or so . . ." You like me are re-inventing the wheel. The "reverse trommel" scrubber has been around for some time. The drum is tilted so the water flows back out the feed end and lifter bars move the material thourgh th machine.

Offline AuExplorer

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #58 on: March 31, 2012, 12:38:04 AM »

Offline XT18000

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Re: Gold ní Clay
« Reply #59 on: March 31, 2012, 05:05:26 AM »

   Somewhere in my collected information I have an article dealing with
     gold -in- clay but for the life of me I can't put my finger on it but
     will keep looking for it. I do remember that it stated that if you had
     gold in clay, you could spread the clay out as best you can where it
     would dry it the sun;  after it is dry and you put it back in water ( as
     in a pan ) it will dissolve with little or no effort and release any gold
     bound in it. Don't know just how much help this would be on a
     large scale but you might try this method to see if it works with your
     clay and then go from there. Never know if you don't try.

 


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