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Author Topic: Gossan??  (Read 3283 times)

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Offline gldigr

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Gossan??
« on: August 07, 2013, 02:16:49 PM »
Is this gosssan? Small opening to a drift mine shaft. No records of this mine exist, however locals say gold was mined here in the 40's. Nearby stream has small flakes and flour gold.[attach=#][/attach]

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Offline XT18000

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Re: Gossan??
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2013, 03:10:48 PM »


    Maybe;    picture to bad to tell, need to set your camera for less pixels so they will post

                  also use flash or find a better way to hole it to reduce shake.

Offline gldigr

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Re: Gossan??
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2013, 09:35:24 PM »
Thanks, I posted a better picture.

Offline GollyMrScience

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Re: Gossan??
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2013, 10:05:20 AM »
A gossan can be as thin and wimpy as a coloured stain or it can form a quite thick crust. Many prospectors refer to a surface crust on the rock as a gossan and others will go so far as to included even soils immediately adjacent to a deposit that have been invaded by the weathering product stain as gossan. Others might tend to describe the coloured soils more as a "weathering product halo". Then you can split hairs over the determination if the halo is made up of original rock weathered or adjacent rock/soils invaded.  ;D
A lot of the differentiation comes from the decision on what the "glue" is that is holding the coloured stain together. If the entire thing has been formed from stuff weathering and leaching into the new crust I head for gossan. If its formed from weathering products leaching out into existing soils I lean towards halo. That's my personal take on it but when it gets down to trying to describe it to another prospector it pays to make sure you are both using  something close to that thinking or at least try to get to a common term of reference. In the pic the yellowish clayey crust might be a gossan in my books but because it looks more like general clayey stuff I would want to know if that clay is a weathered crust or invaded adjacent soils before I tried any definition attempt. Oh ya and the colour has to be from the weathering products too and not just from general groundwater or its own natural colour. A gossan formed from  rusty looking products from a sulphide deposit breaking down versus just iron rich groundwater deposits kinda thing.
What the heck - lets just keep mixin' stuff together till it blows up or smells REALLY bad!