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Author Topic: Mine is a two part question  (Read 3822 times)

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Offline mentalcoincoin

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Mine is a two part question
« on: December 31, 2012, 10:07:35 AM »
I have a mineral claim(Cu/Ag) on Vancouver island and butted up right beside it and aways into it,is what they call an island intrusion of Grandodiorite.I have read about the significance of this,as all porphyry's have intrusions making them sizable.1st question: Just because this intrusion is here does not alot depend on wheather at the time of  its developement,that temperatures and meteoric water have to play a big part as to how or if the surrounding country rock was effected by the intrusion.And is it a given that because of this intrusion,I may have a richer Cu claim?2nd question:any material you could link me,or tell me about moss mat sampling/soil sampling ect.and how that helps build a profile of the surrounding area? Im flying by the seat of my pants here.LOL! Any help would be appreciated,thanx in advance.

Offline EMF

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Re: Mine is a two part question
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2012, 11:53:41 PM »
In regard to your first question, what you need is a clear understanding of the geological history and composition of the country rock, then add to that the history of the rise of the intrusion through it. Study the structural changes brought about by this process. If you can get that picture of geological formation understood, the answer to your question should be clear. Since I don't have the details of that place, I can only generalize this: the emplacement of these monstruosly huge gobs of magma in country rock took place miles deep underground, very hot, under extremely high pressure and not subject to surface conditions. The larger the intrusive mass was, the slower the cooling would be, and that would have an effect on the surrounding rock, as well as on the chemical compositions of all the masses involved. The waters involved in this process would most likely have been subducted into it along with the slab drawn down along the plate that was causing all the frictional heat melting up the magma. Meteoric water could have a role in minerals development at a much later stage, but not at the time of emplacement.

Offline XT18000

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Re: Mine is a two part question
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2013, 05:21:47 AM »

  I'll try to shed some light on the second part of your question

  Soil sampling is primarly a prospecting tool, it can and will
 
  delinate areas that show higher mineralization that the surounding

  areas.  Depending on the area in question and what you are looking

  for you may have Aeromagnetic mapping done, gravity mapping,

  or any of the other methods used, all cost big money.

  You should make every effort to obtain a geological map of your
 
  area  it will be the most help at this stage of your operation.

  You should also try to enlist the services of a fully trained geologist,

  he can be of the most help to keep you from wasting money by
 
  you doing things that are not needed or not done right or at the

  right time. They are well worth there cost!

Offline mentalcoincoin

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Re: Mine is a two part question
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2013, 07:50:30 AM »
To the answer to the 1st question(EMF) thanx so much,never thought of that.I will be trying to seek answers along that path you suggested. For the 2nd (XT18000) also thanx,I have completed 44 assays over an area about 1000ha out of my 1170ha.I have a good average,closer to 2%Cu I'm guessing,need to cruch the numbers.lol I just hired a geo in Nov and had a very comprehensive technical report completed for the MTO and for presentation.My thought is,this spring to do a small moss mat sampling program of around 20-25 along with panning of our major and minor creeks and use of  partners microscope(3000X) to see if my partner and I can further outline any geochemical anomaly's in our claim.   

Offline aumbre

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Re: Mine is a two part question
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2013, 11:08:55 AM »
I am in general agreement with the other responses. Your geologist should be able to provide you with a deposit type model that can be used to compare with other known deposits, their structural setting, mode of emplacement, and exploration options. Enclosed is a page from my old favorite- Corbett and Leach.

Offline mentalcoincoin

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Re: Mine is a two part question
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2013, 01:23:24 PM »
Thanx again Aumbre,I had lost my download to Corbett&Leach. Its a nice piece of written work on the different systems.
Thanx to your reminder Pg 126 I downloaded the full version,and backed it up.Its a world of information.There really is not much info printed about the geology of my area,except its karmutzen basalt,but thats a good place to start.ThankYou for all who have replied.