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Author Topic: Detected treasure stories  (Read 26443 times)

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Offline ebuyc

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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #20 on: December 18, 2012, 05:15:27 AM »
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January 2010 - GAZA CITY, ISREAL - The Hamas-run ministry of tourism and antiquities in Gaza on Monday announced the discovery of ancient artifacts near the Egyptian border town of Rafah.

"The most important of the findings are 1,300 antique silver coins, both large and small," said Mohammed al-Agha, tourism and antiquities minister in the Islamist-run government. He said archaeologists had also uncovered a black basalt grinder, a coin with a cross etched on it, and the remains of walls and arches believed to have been built in 320 BC.

They also discovered a "mysterious" underground compartment with a blocked entrance that appeared to be a tomb, Agha said. The Palestinian Authority has been carrying out archaeological excavations since the 1990s, but this was the first major find to be announced by the Hamas-run government.

The archaeological dig, still under way, is close to where a vast network of smuggling tunnels provides a vital economic lifeline amid strict Israeli and Egyptian closures imposed after the takeover.


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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #21 on: December 18, 2012, 05:16:01 AM »
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July 2010 - LONDON, ENGLAND - A treasure hunter has found about 52,500 Roman coins, one of the largest such finds ever in Britain, officials said Thursday. The hoard, which was valued at 3.3 million pounds ($5 million), includes hundreds of coins bearing the image of Marcus Aurelius Carausius, who seized power in Britain and northern France in the late third century and proclaimed himself emperor.

Dave Crisp, a treasure hunter using a metal detector, located the coins in April in a field in southwestern England, according to the Somerset County Council and the Portable Antiquities Scheme. The coins were buried in a large jar about a foot (30 centimeters) deep and weighed about 160 kilograms (350 pounds) in all.

Crisp said a "funny signal" from his metal detector prompted him to start digging. "I put my hand in, pulled out a bit of clay and there was a little radial, a little bronze Roman coin — very, very small, about the size of my fingernail," Crisp said in an interview with the BBC. He recovered about 20 coins before discovering that they were in a pot, and realized he needed expert help.

"Because Mr. Crisp resisted the temptation to dig up the coins it has allowed archaeologists from Somerset County Council to carefully excavate the pot and its contents, ensuring important evidence about the circumstances of its burial was preserved," said Anna Booth, of Somerset Council. Somerset Coroner Tony Williams scheduled an inquest Thursday to formally determine whether the find is subject to the Treasure Act, a formal step toward determining a price to be paid by any institution which wishes to acquire the hoard.

The hoard is one of the largest ever found in Britain, and will reveal more about the nation's history in the third century, said Roger Bland, of the British Museum. The find includes more than 760 coins from the reign of Carausius, the Roman naval officer who seized power in 286 and ruled until he was assassinated in 293. "The late third century A.D. was a time when Britain suffered barbarian invasions, economic crises and civil wars," Bland said. "Roman rule was finally stabilized when the Emperor Diocletian formed a coalition with the Emperor Maximian, which lasted 20 years. This defeated the separatist regime which had been established in Britain by Carausius.

"This find presents us with an opportunity to put Carausius on the map. School children across the country have been studying Roman Britain for decades, but are never taught about Carausius our lost British emperor." The discovery of the Roman coins follows last year's discovery of a hoard of Anglo-Saxon coins in central England. The so-called Staffordshire Hoard included more than 1,500 objects, mostly made from gold.
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2012, 05:16:38 AM »
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July 2010 - SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA - A bounty within a bounty was discovered inside a 300-year-old bronze cannon that had been taken to a historical conservatory for study. The cannon was part of a 1715 shipwreck off the Florida coast that has been studied for some time by Gold Hound LLC, a treasure hunting group. The ship was headed to Spain when it went down in a hurricane. This latest treasure discovery is valued at $500,000.

Treasure hunters said the cannon was a find in itself, a rare bronze swivel cannon used to fend off pirate enemies on the treasure ship's journey back to King Philip V. The cannon was discovered in shallow waters - less than 15 feet deep - off of Sebastian, Florida, approximately 40 miles north of West Palm Beach. It was found alongside 22 rare gold coins.

The cannon was brought to the conservatory to preserve history, where its hidden bounty was discovered. Among the gold coins was an extremely rare 1698 Cuzco mint coin from a Peruvian mine that operated for just four months, adding to the importance and value of the coin, the news release said. Historians have struggled for decades to unearth more information about the mine, of which little is known.

The remaining gold coins appear to be primarily from Bogotá, Colombia, referred to as “Bogie 2s” for their denominations, the news release said. The silver coins, subject to further identification, likely originate from mines in Mexico and Bolivia.

The 1715 Fleet received a cargo of several million silver coins in Vera Cruz. Bolivia’s Cerro River in Potosi was the single most prolific silver producer in the world for several hundred years, the release said. The 1715 Fleet consisted of 11 Spanish galleons and war ships that sank on July 31, 1715, after they left Havana.


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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2012, 05:17:10 AM »
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August 2010 - SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA - Sunday, 15 August 2010 was one of those days, one of those 'boring' days in Florida when the wind lays the ocean down near the Treasure Coast, and the sea is an aqua blue. Bonnie Schubert and her Mom, Jo, were back in the water after some heavy maintenance on their new salvage boat, "GOLD HAWG" ... and then they found it!

At first thought by most to be an eagle, and by some a turkey, the solid gold bird is preliminarily identified by Historian Dr. Eugene Lyon as a " Pelican in Piety"-- representing the legend of the 'mother pelican' wounding her breast to feed her young on the droplets of her own blood and used as a symbol of Christ's sacrifice.

Standing a stately 5-1/2 inches tall, the avian relic weighs 177 grams --that's without her right wing-- and she tests out at 22 karats of pure gold. In her heyday, her open torso held something, probably something ritualistic, possibly an incense container.

Through a hole in the center of her base, she may have been mounted to a pole ... or to an altar. We'll have to wait for the jury to come in with all the details on this wondrous piece. The ornate base of this statuette, on which the bird is standing, resembles a turban and displays what could be a 'Fleur-de-Lis' on the face of it.

"It was just Mom and me aboard the 'Gold Hawg' (C-11, Harold’s old number – for luck!) – I still am in shock. Didn’t think we were even going to make it out there this year, what with engine rebuild and etc." "One wing is missing, and I have been out three days searching for it – no luck there and now our fingers are crossed that we get in a few more days ... but it looks like the tropics are firing up."
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2012, 05:17:40 AM »
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September 2010 - WESTERN AUSTRALIA - Last weekend the Western Australian gold prospectors assembled for their annual meeting at the pub in Ora Banda, a hamlet in the Western Australian outback. At the end of the meeting a nugget buyer from Perth, a guy named Andy Comas, made quite an interesting announcement: he recently acquired and sold a nugget weighing 23.26 kilogram, making it the world’s third largest gold nugget in existence (just after the Hand of Faith at 27.21 kg and the Normandy Nugget at 25.5 kg). When Andy showed a picture of the monster the bar went dead quiet. People just couldn’t take their eyes of it. This was of course what every prospector dreams of and keeps him going: the bloody big one!

The nugget had been found a couple of weeks ago with a metal detector somewhere in the goldfields around here. Through various tests it had been established that the thing has a 92% purity. With today’s gold price of around 1240 US Dollars, the gold value of this baby would be around $860,000. But of course, nuggets of that rarity go for two, three times the gold value.

Anyway, Andy said that the prospector who found it, and who wishes to remain anonymous, gave him a week to sell it. Andy sold it for an undisclosed sum within a couple of days to a buyer in the US. No Australian could come up with the money, somewhat surprising with all the filthy rich mining executives around here.

Most prospectors in the room expressed regret or even outrage that this nugget would leave the country – although no doubt they would have done the exact same thing: sell it to the highest bidder. And they even might get their wish because the story doesn’t end here. The Australian government might declare the nugget a National Treasure – and I think they should – and then Andy wouldn’t be able to export it.
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #25 on: December 18, 2012, 05:18:18 AM »
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October 2010 - LONDON, ENGLAND - A valuable hoard of American gold coins has been unearthed in an east London garden — one of Britain's most curious treasure finds.

Buried hoards are discovered every so often, but their Anglo-Saxon, Viking or Roman owners were themselves interred long ago. Whoever hid the 80 coins from the 19th and early 20th centuries may be alive. Why they chose the garden of a residential block in Hackney is a mystery.

Archaeologists more used to deciphering which Roman emperor is depicted on a coin have been taken aback by the find — gold $20 “Double Eagle” pieces dating from 1854 to 1913 and minted mostly in San Francisco and Philadelphia. Estimates put the value at hundreds of thousands of pounds. The coins, so large that each one weighs 33 grams, go on show at the Museum of London tomorrow.

They were uncovered by two residents who decided to do gardening with a couple of friends. A spade hit something hard. Expecting to remove a brick or a rock, they found themselves staring at glistening gold. One finder, interested in archaeology, alerted the Museum of London, which contacted the Portable Antiquities Scheme at the British Museum. Scheme head Dr Roger Bland told the Standard: “There is a huge mystery about who might have buried the coins. It's wonderful to speculate. Who buries so many gold coins?”

Today Inner North London coroner Dr Andrew Scott Reid, announcing the find, said the original owner had until next spring to come forward. The finders are remaining anonymous and the find's location is not being released to discourage false claims. An ill-gotten gain has to be possible and police records are being checked. If the coins are declared Treasure, they will become Crown property and will be valued. Hackney Museum wants to acquire them and the money paid would be split between the land owner and the finders.
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #26 on: December 18, 2012, 05:18:48 AM »
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November 2010 - LONDON, ENGLAND - If James Hyatt was old enough to understand the concept, his family would tell him he is blessed with beginner’s luck. The three-year-old was minutes into his first ever attempt at metal detecting when he found a gold locket potentially worth £2.5million. He had just been passed the device at a field in Hockley, Essex, when it began to buzz.

Buried 8in below was a reliquary. This is a gold container used to hold religious relics – items believed to be the remains of religious figures or objects associated with them. Experts have dated the locket to the early 16th century – the era of Henry VIII – and say it could have belonged to a member of the royal family.

The reliquary has been declared treasure trove at an inquest, meaning the proceeds of its sale will be shared between James’s family and the landowner. The sides of the reliquary are about an inch long and it is 73 per cent gold. The front is engraved with an image of the Virgin Mary clutching a cross while the back has five bleeding hearts. Only three other reliquaries of this type are known to have survived. James’s find will be valued and then offered for sale to institutions including the British Museum.
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #27 on: December 18, 2012, 05:19:24 AM »
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March 2011 - NEWARK, ENGLAND - A treasure hunter has found 18 Bronze Age items in a field near Newark in Nottinghamshire. Maurice Richardson stumbled across the collection, which includes four socket axes, a spear head, a chisel and a fragmented sword, by mistake. "I was on my way back to the car after being out all afternoon and wandered off the track," he said. "If I hadn't I wouldn't have found it."

This is the third major discovery Mr Richardson has made. In 2005 he dug up an ancient necklace valued at £350,000 while in 2010 he found a hoard of Roman coins. The tools were found just a foot below the surface of a farmer's field. The first things to be dug out were three of the four axes; Mr Richardson said he immediately knew what they were. The items have been confirmed by Dr Chris Robinson, an archaeological officer from Nottinghamshire County Council, as a founders hoard.

"Bronze Age metal workers tended to be itinerant. They would travel around the land plying their trade," said Dr Robinson. "Often they would bury their produce and come back for it later."

The finds will now be submitted to the Portable Antiques Scheme (PAS) so that they can be recorded. Research by Mr Richardson suggests that his latest hoard may be worth a few thousand pounds. But the tree surgeon said his hobby, which he has been doing every Saturday and Sunday afternoon for 40 years, is nothing to do with the money. "It's the interest in the local history and the buzz from handling something that is thousands of years old," he said. Mr Richardson confessed that there was no secret to his success. "It's embarrassing really. There's no recipe. It just seems to happen," he said.
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2012, 05:20:02 AM »
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March 2011 - SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA - It took only two minutes of feverish bidding at a Sacramento auction Wednesday for a buyer to snatch up the biggest existing gold nugget confirmed to have been dug out of Sierra foothills Forty-Niner country. Feverish might be an understatement. The bidder had to cough up $460,000.

The Washington Nugget, which fits in one hand, weighs 8.2 pounds and would have fetched something less than its flat value of $137,744 at current gold prices, considering it has a few rock veins shooting through it. But this isn't merely meltdown gold. This chunk has a story. It was scratched out of the earth by a man wielding a pick in his backyard near the historic town of Washington (Nevada County). That means it was found in the same area where the old Forty-Niners spent their days scramblin', diggin' and wieldin' smoking six-guns in the mid-1800s in the most famous Gold Rush in American history.

Other big hunks of gold exist in museums and private collections, but none is quite like this one, California State Library historians said. If not for a few fateful twists of many shovels, the Washington Nugget might have been found 150 years ago as prospectors extracted millions of dollars worth of gold from the hills and streams around Washington. Instead, the finder pinged it with a metal detector last March.

The finder and the auctioneers have jealously guarded his name for his protection - same with the name of the man who bought the nugget. All the co-auctioneer, coin dealer Don Kagin of Tiburon, would say Wednesday was that the buyer was from "back East," and the seller was "very pleased."

Bidding on the Washington Nugget at the Golden West Auction in Sacramento started at 4:45 p.m., and the opening shot was $250,000. By 4:47 a flurry of bidders had topped each other with bids up to $400,000 - and that's where the hammer fell. The final price was $460,000, once a fee had been tacked on for Kagin and his auction partner, mining geologist Fred Holabird of Reno.

"There's a real art to these things," Kagin said. "The bidding moves at 100 miles an hour." Turns out the bidding might keep on moving. The seller was so inspired by the sale of the nugget sale that he asked Kagin afterward to sell the land where the nugget was found. It consists of 180 acres about 20 miles east of Nevada City, and assayers have already guessed there are at least 4,000 ounces of gold left to drag out of the dirt, Kagin said.

And, oh yes - the seller found two smaller nuggets when he found the whopper. Weighing 4 and 10 ounces, they sold Wednesday for $7,700 and $17,000 to a different bidder. "We'll be looking into auctioning the land after we figure a few things out," Kagin said.

Update: This nugget may have been originally found in Australia.
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Re: Detected treasure stories
« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2012, 05:20:34 AM »
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March 2011 - KEY WEST, FLORIDA - A deep sea diver has struck gold after unearthing a 17th century chain worth $250,000 from the ocean floor. Bill Burt, a diver for Mel Fisher's Treasures, spotted the 40-inch gold chain while looking for the wrecked Nuestra Senora de Atocha, which sank off the Florida Keys in a 1622 hurricane. Shipwreck experts have tentatively valued the piece at around $250,000.

The chain has 55 links, an enamelled gold cross and a two-sided engraved religious medallion featuring the Virgin Mary and a chalice. On the edges of the cross there is engraved wording thought to be in Latin. Andy Matroci, captain of Mel Fisher's Treasures salvage vessel, JB Magruder, said the crew had been diving at the North end of the Atocha trail.

On their last trip to the wreck they uncovered 22 silver coins and a cannon ball just east of the site. They had been hoping to find more coins in the area, Mr Matroci said, but instead found the chain.

'In the nine years I have been running this boat this is the most unique artifact we have brought up,' Mr Matroci said. The piece is believed to be from the Atocha's infamous treasure trove. The company has uncovered half a billion dollars in historic artefacts, gold, silver and emeralds since they began diving the wreck in 1969.

In 1985 - after 15 years of searching - the Fisher crew discovered Atocha's 'mother lode', worth more than $450 million. They unearthed thousands of artifacts, silver coins, gold coins - many in near mint condition, exquisite jewellery sets with precious stones, gold chains, disks, a variety of armaments and even seeds, which later sprouted.

They then faced a legal wrangle with the U.S. Government claimed title to the wreck. Florida state officials seized many of the items the Fisher crew had retrieved. But after eight years of litigation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Fisher's favor. The contents of the ships sterncastle - a wooden, fort-shaped area at the back of ship, have never been recovered.

This is where the wealthy passengers, including nobility and clergy, would have stayed. Fisher's estimates the treasure in the sterncastle section is worth in the region of half a billion dollars. The latest find was likely owned by a member of the clergy indicating the company's search for the missing treasure trove could be getting nearer.
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