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Author Topic: How I choose a Caribbean resort for Detecting  (Read 6149 times)

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Offline sunshine

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How I choose a Caribbean resort for Detecting
« on: December 04, 2012, 11:22:44 AM »
All other things (the stuff my wife thinks about) being equal, I choose the resort that has the most detecting potential. 

Bar none, my best metal detecting for jewellery has been in the Caribbean ocean. 

I avoid Cuba, because I don't want to deal with their security, as they may not understand detecting. 

My favorite are the English speaking islands (because my Dutch, French and Spanish is not so good - and people insist on talking to me when detecting),  where the shoreline is private (eg. Jamaica), which controls/limits access.  In other places (eg. Barbados), nobody owns the waterfront, so people can access everywhere.  I know this sounds backwards, but here is my thinking - if everybody has access, then everybody with a detector has already been there. 

The "perfect storm" is a kind of private resort with its own private beach and is located beside a pay as you go public beach that does not "allow" metal detecting.  I confirm before booking the trip, that the hotel will allow me to detect their private beach.  At the same time I ask them their agreed polcy for access to the public beach next door (sometimes they have an arrangement).  I have never heard a "no detecting" from a resort.  Worst case, I will spend all of my time there and will attempt to clean it out.  The "icing on the cake" comes from access to the beach next door.  Usually, I am able to walk right over to it around a fence.  Typically, they do not want you to detect there during the daytime because it might bother other guests.  Sometimes, it is just the life guards who want the lost stuff for themselves (they look for it with mask and snorkel).  However, management is sometimes open to allowing detecting after-hours.  If I get a "no" during the day, I walk over at night and have a chat with security.  For a few dollars, I usually get both permission and have them to "watch my back" while I hit their beach.  At night, I can usually detect wearing a swim suit in the water for about 1.5 hours before getting too cold.  However, it is not a bad idea to bring along a wet suit for protection (warmth and critters).  At night you cannot see jelly fish and I have been stung countless times (a quick treatment is pour urine on it - sounds gross, but it works).  Because wet suits are buoyant, a weight belt is a good idea (bring down 10 lbs on the plane or rent one from the dive shop).
See my YouTube channel for fun amateur video:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnz8kX6AZOeZbRt0F9XqVJA

Offline Former Guest

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Re: How I choose a Caribbean resort for Detecting
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2012, 10:41:35 AM »
Very great idea you have loved it. Please post any pics of stuff found on holidays oh and have a great time there cheers Ray

Offline ebuyc

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Re: How I choose a Caribbean resort for Detecting
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 05:49:18 AM »
All other things (the stuff my wife thinks about) being equal, I choose the resort that has the most detecting potential. 

Bar none, my best metal detecting for jewellery has been in the Caribbean ocean. 

I avoid Cuba, because I don't want to deal with their security, as they may not understand detecting. 

My favorite are the English speaking islands (because my Dutch, French and Spanish is not so good - and people insist on talking to me when detecting),  where the shoreline is private (eg. Jamaica), which controls/limits access.  In other places (eg. Barbados), nobody owns the waterfront, so people can access everywhere.  I know this sounds backwards, but here is my thinking - if everybody has access, then everybody with a detector has already been there. 

The "perfect storm" is a kind of private resort with its own private beach and is located beside a pay as you go public beach that does not "allow" metal detecting.  I confirm before booking the trip, that the hotel will allow me to detect their private beach.  At the same time I ask them their agreed polcy for access to the public beach next door (sometimes they have an arrangement).  I have never heard a "no detecting" from a resort.  Worst case, I will spend all of my time there and will attempt to clean it out.  The "icing on the cake" comes from access to the beach next door.  Usually, I am able to walk right over to it around a fence.  Typically, they do not want you to detect there during the daytime because it might bother other guests.  Sometimes, it is just the life guards who want the lost stuff for themselves (they look for it with mask and snorkel).  However, management is sometimes open to allowing detecting after-hours.  If I get a "no" during the day, I walk over at night and have a chat with security.  For a few dollars, I usually get both permission and have them to "watch my back" while I hit their beach.  At night, I can usually detect wearing a swim suit in the water for about 1.5 hours before getting too cold.  However, it is not a bad idea to bring along a wet suit for protection (warmth and critters).  At night you cannot see jelly fish and I have been stung countless times (a quick treatment is pour urine on it - sounds gross, but it works).  Because wet suits are buoyant, a weight belt is a good idea (bring down 10 lbs on the plane or rent one from the dive shop).

Good information, doubt I will have need of it - but I can DREAM!

Thanks for sharing!

Did someone say       

Offline Former Guest

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Re: How I choose a Caribbean resort for Detecting
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 08:18:57 PM »
My brother lives on Maui Hawaii and when i was there did see different ppl with detectors there on the beaches away for busy areas. They find keys jewellery rings coins and many other things. Did some diving with my brother to check out ocean floor that was a cool time and never found anything but a fun day out in the water. Got to swim in schools of fish that was cool feel them bump into you as they swim around you very cool. Also lots of ppl snorkle in shallow areas for same reason cheers Ray

Offline SnipesNL

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Re: How I choose a Caribbean resort for Detecting
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2013, 12:00:01 PM »
I think this is a very interesting topic. Years ago I went to a wedding in cuba. The guy getting married wanted to bring a metal detector. I didn't know anything about metal detecting or cuba at the time and told him he was crazy and we never bothered. If I had to go now I totally would. I know you could defiantly pay the people on the resort to look the other way. My only concern would be people confiscating the detector at the airports. Just my two cents.