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Gold Prospecting Forums - General => Rockhounding, Gem & Mineral Collecting => Topic started by: Mar-Kea on June 30, 2014, 10:05:58 PM

Title: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on June 30, 2014, 10:05:58 PM
Anyone know what this is?  It's dark green, looks waxy, and the white looking shiny part is little crystals all over it.

Mar-Kea [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]

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Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: sunshine on July 01, 2014, 08:15:44 AM
I would guess Serpentine.  It would have a hardness of 3-4.5 and streaks white.  It can be associated with fibrous/flexible asbestos, so be careful as that is cancer causing and should then be stored in a closed container or bag. 
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on July 01, 2014, 01:40:57 PM
No, it streaks green.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: aumbre on July 01, 2014, 03:47:47 PM
Soapstone? EMF will probably recognize that type of rock. Did it come from the Klamath Mts.?
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on July 02, 2014, 01:37:19 AM
Not sure where its from. A friend gave it to me.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: EMF on July 04, 2014, 06:58:37 PM
That one is more difficult to identify by picture alone than most. Can it be scratched with a knife? Is it harder or softer than quartz? The feature that makes it challenging is that it appears to have a weakly chonchoidal fracture. It could be be just the way the photo presents it too. From the photo there appear to be several minerals together in that piece, but if you answer the questions we can probably figure it out.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on July 04, 2014, 07:49:14 PM
Knife leaves a white streak on the rock. Dropped on another rock and hit with rock pick. Didn't break. Fractures were already there.

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Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on July 04, 2014, 07:51:23 PM
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Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: EMF on July 05, 2014, 10:49:19 AM
Looking at the new pictures and knowing that a knife can scratch it tells me you have a rock known as serpentinite.  It is a metamorphic rock composed of minerals in the serpentine family, things like antigorite, harzburgite, chrysotile, lizardite, etc. Antigorite is one that is easily mistaken for jade, but a knife will scratch the antigorite and not the jade. Take care not fragment it in closed spaces, because there is the small chance of liberating asbestos particles (the chrysotile) into the air you breathe.  There is likely to be a lot of magnetite in that rock, and if so a rare earth magnet will be drawn to it. If you look closely you may even spot some chromite in it.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on July 07, 2014, 01:30:59 PM
Thanks. I spent yesterday finding the place she found it. It's in south east oregon. It's found with petrified wood. Some of the rocks are a mint green.

It is not magnetic. Some other people were there looking for some they said it was jasper. Now I'm really confused. Lol
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: EMF on July 08, 2014, 09:35:01 AM
Jasper can be colored green, and also yellow and most commonly red. But jasper is too hard to scratch with a knife. It is a form of quartz, made of a mass of tiny crystals, and as a result a bit harder to shatter than common quartz. In your specimen, the lighter colored material is most likely to be a carbonate mineral, a common associate with serpentinite. Muriatic acid will cause bubbllng if it is touched to carbonate minerals and is a common test for such.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Mar-Kea on July 08, 2014, 08:36:46 PM
Ok.  Now I know how to check the hardness too. Lol. Thanks for the help. Whisk you were here, my moms yard is full of rocks we've collected that were not sure of. Except the obsidian. Thsnks again.

Mar-Kea
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Johnnydanger on August 11, 2014, 08:56:29 PM
I was out gold mining with my husband on the North Saskatchewan River and found this cool rock in his sluice.
It's shiny and when I scratched the tile it was a faint white line.
I think Quartz scratched it, having a hard time seeing scratches on it, the nail scratch wiped off.
I did the salt water float test for amber and it didn't float.
I would appreciate help figuring out what it might be?

(http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e12/freyavolstad/66f6be53dddbad031f7b21c7d446510c_zpsa20e3cc2.jpg)

(http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e12/freyavolstad/e4e897b3f32045f206335634e1571817_zps1723ea83.jpg)

Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Johnnydanger on August 11, 2014, 09:05:14 PM
Here are a few more pictures of it under the light


(http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e12/freyavolstad/2c2ef146bc9c528d2972a88f770a3472_zps22dfbff7.jpg)

(http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e12/freyavolstad/c44884f9f8554faddd33cb0b65702a88_zpsbd89c2b5.jpg)

Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: aumbre on August 11, 2014, 09:10:52 PM
A concretion ?
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: Johnnydanger on August 12, 2014, 06:17:44 PM
How would I be able to tell if it's a concretion?
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: aumbre on August 13, 2014, 02:56:19 PM
Probably not a concretion which is just a nodule like mineral that has formed by layering sort of like a pearl.
Ive seen that kind of thing before- in W. New Mexico and also E. Oregon but I can't remember what they are called. I think they are kind of like an agate perhaps formed in cavities by solution. Don't think they are too uncommon and someone should be able to ID.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: EMF on September 03, 2014, 12:58:16 PM
That is a nodule of clear chalcedony. It is the same mineral as agate, but without the layered colors that would make it agate. The hardness is typically between 6.5 and 7, so quartz can scratch it, but not easily. Try looking at it under UV light. Sometimes chalcedony glows with some bright colors in those conditions. It might make a nice looking cabachon.
Title: Re: Rock identification
Post by: ronnymcc on December 26, 2014, 11:32:54 AM
It looks like serpentine to me. I found some up around Dease lake area. I also talked to a person at the jade mine at Hogem mtn; he showed me several samples of jade and serpentine. Your description fits serpentine. :) :) :)